September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Visual performance of U.S military servicemembers (USM) in identification of infrared targets after wavefront-guided (WFG) and wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and LASIK
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Denise S. Ryan
    Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, United States
    WRESP, Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Rose Kristine Sia
    Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, United States
    WRESP, Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Lamarr Peppers
    Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, United States
    WRESP, Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Jennifer B. Eaddy
    Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, United States
    WRESP, Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Richard D. Stutzman
    Ophthalmology, George Washington University, District of Columbia, District of Columbia, United States
  • Joseph Pasternak
    Ophthalmology, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Tana Maurer
    Human Perception Lab, Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, United States
  • Christopher L. Howell
    Human Perception Lab, Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, United States
  • Bruce Rivers
    Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, United States
  • Kraig S Bower
    Wilmer Eye Institute, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Denise Ryan, None; Rose Sia, None; Lamarr Peppers, None; Jennifer Eaddy, None; Richard Stutzman, None; Joseph Pasternak, None; Tana Maurer, None; Christopher Howell, None; Bruce Rivers, None; Kraig Bower, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Funded by USAMRAA Award W81XWH-09-2-0018
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 4861. doi:
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      Denise S. Ryan, Rose Kristine Sia, Lamarr Peppers, Jennifer B. Eaddy, Richard D. Stutzman, Joseph Pasternak, Tana Maurer, Christopher L. Howell, Bruce Rivers, Kraig S Bower; Visual performance of U.S military servicemembers (USM) in identification of infrared targets after wavefront-guided (WFG) and wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and LASIK. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):4861.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To assess the probability of identification (PID) of combat vehicles in infrared images by USM before and after undergoing WFG and WFO PRK and LASIK.

Methods : In this prospective study, USM (mean age 29.9 ±5.5 years) with myopia or myopic astigmatism electing to undergo PRK or LASIK (mean manifest refractive spherical equivalent -3.78 ±1.44 diopters ) were randomized to receive either WFG (VISX CustomVue STAR S4 IR, Abbott Medical Optics) or WFO surgery (Wavelight Allegretto Wave EyeQ, Alcon Surgical). Pre- and postop clinical exams included visual acuity tests, refraction, and slit lamp exam. USM also underwent computer based experiments, preop with optical correction and at 6 weeks (W) and 6 months (M) postop without correction, to assess PID: 1) with infrared imagery captured in multiple wavebands and digitally fused using an image-averaging algorithm; and 2) with varying target contrasts. The PID for each experiment and among the treatment groups were compared using a repeated measures analysis of variance. Association of PID with the postop visual acuity, residual refractive error and surgery was analyzed using linear regression. A p-value <0.05 considered statistically significant.

Results : Of the 53 participants, 14 underwent WFG PRK, 12 WFG LASIK, 13 WFO PRK and 14 WFO LASIK. At 6M postop, all eyes achieved uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) of 20/20 or better except for one eye treated with WFO PRK. There was no loss of more than one line of corrected distance visual acuity. In identifying combat vehicles, there was no significant difference among the treatment groups in PID over time whether the targets in different wavebands were fused (p=0.92) or the target mean, background mean, and standard deviation of the target signatures were altered (p=0.59). There were no significant associations between the 6M UDVA, MSE as well as the type of surgery and the PID for combat vehicles in fused wavebands (p=0.72) or in varying contrasts (p=0.72).

Conclusions : The application of WFG and WFO technologies for PRK and LASIK results in excellent refractive outcomes. In the context of military operations, these techniques are effective in reducing soldiers' dependence on corrective lenses while maintaining their ability to perform military relevant tasks, such as infrared target identification.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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