September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Involvement of long noncoding RNAs in ocular angiogenesis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shusheng Wang
    Cell and Molecular Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
    Ophthalmology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Qinbo Zhou
    Cell and Molecular Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Chastain Anderson
    Cell and Molecular Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Jakub Hanus
    Cell and Molecular Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Fangkun Zhao
    Cell and Molecular Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Jing Ma
    Cell and Molecular Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Shusheng Wang, None; Qinbo Zhou, None; Chastain Anderson, None; Jakub Hanus, None; Fangkun Zhao, None; Jing Ma, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  S. W was supported by NIH Grant EY021862, a career development award from the Research to Prevent Blindness foundation, and a Bright Focus Foundation Award in Age-related Macular Degeneration. Q. Z was supported by an American Heart Association (AHA) postdoctoral fellowship.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 4992. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Shusheng Wang, Qinbo Zhou, Chastain Anderson, Jakub Hanus, Fangkun Zhao, Jing Ma; Involvement of long noncoding RNAs in ocular angiogenesis. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):4992.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The role of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in ocular angiogenesis is largely unknown. The purpose of the project is to identify human endothelial cell (EC)-specific lncRNAs and test their involvement in ocular angiogenesis.

Methods : lncRNA profiling using ocular EC lines and non EC lines was performed to identify EC-specific lncRNAs. Quantitative RT-PCR and and bioinformatics analysis were used to confirm the microarray results, and test their involvement in angiogenesis. Various angiogenesis assays, including Matrigel assays and EC-fibroblast co-culture assays were used to study the candidate lncRNAs in angiogenesis.

Results : We identified ~500 lncRNAs that are enriched more than 2 folds in primary endothelial cells (ECs) compared to non-EC cells. A list of the lncRNAs show a correlated expression profile with nearby coding mRNAs that are implicated in vascular development by functional enrichment analysis. For many of them, the EC-specific expression is more robust than their neighboring genes. To study the function of lncRNAs in ECs, we focused on one novel lncRNA, named as lnc-angio1, which is enriched in highly vascularized human tissues, including lung, placenta and heart. Silencing of lncAngio1 represses EC proliferation and migration, and impairs vascular tube formation in both Matrigel and EC/fibroblast co-culture angiogenesis assays.

Conclusions : Our study established the lncRNA expression profile in ocular ECs and identified lncAngio1 as an EC-enriched lncRNA that is critical for angiogenesis.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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