September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Patients with Dry Eye Disease and Low Subbasal Nerve Density are at High Risk for Progressive Corneal Endothelial Cell Loss
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vannarut Satitpitakul
    Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Ahmad Kheirkhah
    Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Pedram Hamrah
    Ophthalmology, NEEC, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Reza Dana
    Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Vannarut Satitpitakul, None; Ahmad Kheirkhah, None; Pedram Hamrah, None; Reza Dana, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Research for prevent blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 5272. doi:
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      Vannarut Satitpitakul, Ahmad Kheirkhah, Pedram Hamrah, Reza Dana; Patients with Dry Eye Disease and Low Subbasal Nerve Density are at High Risk for Progressive Corneal Endothelial Cell Loss. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):5272.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To evaluate the changes in corneal endothelial cell density (CECD) over time in patients with dry eye disease (DED)

Methods : This retrospective study included 40 eyes of 20 patients with mild to moderate DED (60.4 ± 12.3 years old). Laser in vivo confocal microscopy was performed of the central cornea in both eyes and was repeated after a mean follow-up of 33.2 ± 10.2 months (range, 21-57 months). The densities of corneal endothelial cells and subbasal nerves were measured using the variable-frame method and NeuronJ tracing, respectively, and compared with 13 eyes of age-matched controls (56.8 ± 4.8 years old).

Results : At the initial visit, the DED group had lower densities of CECD (2619.9 ± 385.6 cells/mm2) and subbasal nerves (17.8 ± 7.5 mm/mm2) compared to the control group (2861.0 ± 292.3 cells/mm2 and 22.8 ± 3.0 mm/mm2, with P=0.07 and P=0.01, respectively). At the last follow-up, although the subbasal nerve density remained similar (16.7 ± 7.2 mm/mm2, P=0.43), the mean CECD decreased to 2465.1 ± 391.2 cells/mm2 (P=0.01), with a mean corneal endothelial loss of 2.1 ± 3.6% per year. The endothelial cell loss showed a statistically significant negative correlation with initial subbasal nerve density (Rs= -0.55, P=0.02). Although the initial CECD had significant correlation with age (Rs= -0.60, P=0.01), the endothelial cell loss over time did not correlate with age.

Conclusions : Patients with DED have increased progressive corneal endothelial cell loss compared to age-matched controls. Lower subbasal nerve density is a risk factor for increased endothelial cell loss over time.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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