September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Laboratory Evaluation of Hypercoagulable States May Prove Unnecessary in Patients with Central Retinal Vein Occlusion Who are Less Than 56 Years of Age
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Qingyun Liu
    Ophthalmology, UCSF, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Jacquelyn D. Kemmer
    Ophthalmology, UCSF, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Kornwipa Hemarat
    Ophthalmology, UCSF, San Francisco, California, United States
  • J. Michael Lahey
    Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Hayward, California, United States
  • Jay M Stewart
    Ophthalmology, UCSF, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Qingyun Liu, None; Jacquelyn Kemmer, None; Kornwipa Hemarat, None; J. Lahey, None; Jay Stewart, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Research to Prevent Blindness and That Man May See, Inc.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 5347. doi:
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      Qingyun Liu, Jacquelyn D. Kemmer, Kornwipa Hemarat, J. Michael Lahey, Jay M Stewart; Laboratory Evaluation of Hypercoagulable States May Prove Unnecessary in Patients with Central Retinal Vein Occlusion Who are Less Than 56 Years of Age. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):5347.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To investigate whether the results of early laboratory tests for hypercoagulable states are correlated with the development of CRVO risk factors later in life and to evaluate necessity of these tests in younger CRVO patients.

Methods : From January 1995 to December 2014, 55 patients under 56 years of age with CRVO were enrolled in the study. Laboratory evaluations for hypercoagulable states were performed in all the patients at the onset of CRVO. After 0 to 205 months follow-up, the presence of risk factors for CRVO such as hypertension, obesity, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea and glaucoma was determined. Bilateral correlation and logistic regression were performed to determine the correlations between the results of the initial laboratory tests and the diagnosis of CRVO risk factors.

Results : The mean follow-up was 130.67±60.10 months. By the end of this study, 50 patients completed at least 24 months follow-up, 45 patients completed at least 5 years, and 36 patients completed at least 10 years of follow-up. Fifteen of 55 patients (27.27%) had at least one positive test result at the onset of CRVO. At the end of follow-up, 11 patients had been diagnosed with obesity (20%), 29 with hypertension (52.73%), 21 with hyperlipidemia (38.18%), 24 with diabetes mellitus (43.64%), 5 with sleep apnea (9.09%) and 8 with glaucoma (14.55%). Among 36 patients who completed a minimum 10 years follow-up, 30 patients (83.33%) developed at least one common risk factor and none of them experienced any thromboembolic events. There were no correlations between the results of laboratory tests and diagnosis of any CRVO risk factors in patients with a minimum of 2 years, 5 years or 10 years follow-up (P>0.05).

Conclusions : These findings suggest that the results of laboratory tests evaluating hypercoagulability in young patients with CRVO are not correlated with later-developed risk factors for CRVO. Many of the common risk factors for CRVO were present in a high percentage of patients by the end of the study, suggesting that they still remain the core etiology for the disease. The value of the thrombophilic tests is brought into question as none of the patients demonstrated further clotting or any unusual thrombi with long term follow up.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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