September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Effects of ultra violet radiation on serum vitamin D levels in chick experimental myopia models
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kiwako Mori
    Laboratory of Photobiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Toshihide Kurihara
    Laboratory of Photobiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Xiaoyan Jiang
    Laboratory of Photobiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Maki Miyauchi
    Laboratory of Photobiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Yusaku Katada
    Laboratory of Photobiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Yukihiro Miwa
    Laboratory of Photobiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Yuko Seko
    Visual Functions Section, Department of Rehabilitation for Sensory Functions, Research Institute,, National Rehabilitation Center for Persons with Disabilities, Tokorozawa, Japan
  • Hidemasa Torii
    Laboratory of Photobiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Kazuo Tsubota
    Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Kiwako Mori, None; Toshihide Kurihara, None; Xiaoyan Jiang, None; Maki Miyauchi, None; Yusaku Katada, None; Yukihiro Miwa, None; Yuko Seko, None; Hidemasa Torii, None; Kazuo Tsubota, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 5522. doi:
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      Kiwako Mori, Toshihide Kurihara, Xiaoyan Jiang, Maki Miyauchi, Yusaku Katada, Yukihiro Miwa, Yuko Seko, Hidemasa Torii, Kazuo Tsubota; Effects of ultra violet radiation on serum vitamin D levels in chick experimental myopia models. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):5522.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : It has been reported that sun exposure may suppress progression of myopia in previous studies. The mechanism of myopia progression modulated by light exposure has, however, still been unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of short wavelength ultra violet (UV) exposure on the initiation and progression of myopia analyzing chick lens-induced myopia (LIM) models.

Methods : One eye of each chick was covered by a minus 9 diopter glass goggle to produce an LIM model from postnatal day 5 to 12 for 7 days. The animals were randomly assigned to two groups, one of which is put under a white visible light environment, the control group, and the other is under the environment of 305-nm UV exposures, the UV exposure group. The control group had 18 chicks, and the UV group had 21. The animals were kept under a 12/12-hour light-dark cycle. Ocular components including axial length were evaluated by a B-mode ultrasound. Serum 25-OH vitamin D level and body weight changes were also analyzed. Statistics were performed using a Student t-test and a Spearman’s rank sum correlation test. The p value was considered significant when it is less than 0.05.

Results : The UV exposure group showed a significant (p=0.017) shorter axial length (8.28±0.33 mm, mean±SD) and a significant (p<0.001) shorter vitreous chamber depth (5.69±0.22 mm) compared to the control group in LIM eyes (8.52±0.26 mm and 6.02±0.22 mm, respectively). A significant (p<0.001) increase of the serum 25-OH vitamin D level (90.38±24.56 ng/ml) and a significant (p<0.001) decrease of the body weight changes (30.89±5.56 grams) were observed by the UV exposure compared to the control group (39.56±12.06 ng/ml and 54.29±4.27 grams, respectively). The vitamin D levels were inversely correlated with the axial length in uncovered eyes (y=-0.048x+1.4263, R2=0.1568, p=0.014), whereas they were not in LIM eyes. Some chicks were found to have ulcerative lesions on the feet and corneae.

Conclusions : Short wavelength UV, 305-nm, irradiation induced various ocular and systemic parameter changes. Serum vitamin D level may be associated with myopia initiation, but not with its progression. Short wavelength UV irradiation may be detrimental causing skin and corneal ulcers.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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