September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Sharp injuries in ophthalmology residency: results of a resident quality improvement project
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aliya Zul Jiwani
    Ophthalmology, Mass. Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Jo Anne Ricca
    Ophthalmology, Mass. Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Carolyn Kloek
    Ophthalmology, Mass. Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Aliya Jiwani, None; Jo Anne Ricca, None; Carolyn Kloek, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 5540. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Aliya Zul Jiwani, Jo Anne Ricca, Carolyn Kloek; Sharp injuries in ophthalmology residency: results of a resident quality improvement project. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):5540.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : While sharp injuries may occur more frequently in residents1-3 than other health care workers, few studies in the US examine sharp injuries in residents1-5 and none specifically examine ophthalmology residents. The purpose of this research is to characterize sharp injuries among ophthalmology residents at a high volume academic center with a high number of resident procedures.

Methods : A retrospective chart review was conducted of the 27 ophthalmology resident sharp incident reports filed at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary’s (MEEI) occupational health from 2009-2014. An anonymous survey was administered to the 24 current MEEI ophthalmology residents in June 2015.

Results : The 27 sharp injuries reported to occupational health by ophthalmology residents occurred more frequently to PGY-2s, during oculoplastics procedures and with suture needles. The source patient’s blood was drawn 89% (24/27) of the time, and 12.5% (3/24) of the source patient’s blood was positive. For the anonymous survey, 83% (20/24) responded. Of the respondents, 45% (9/20) self-reported at least one sharp stick during ophthalmology residency, but 2 of these residents failed to report the injuries. The majority (71%, 5/7) of those who reported the stick felt the reporting process was very easy to reasonable, with 29% (2/7) reporting that it was cumbersome. 70% of respondents knew how to report a sharp injury at the primary teaching site, but only 10-20% knew how to do so at the other 7 sites. Qualitative comments were collected about factors contributing to the injury and reasons for non-reporting.

Conclusions : Education in sharp safety to decrease injuries and improve reporting rates may be helpful.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×