September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Ophthalmology in the Emergency Department: A survey of Emergency Medicine Residents
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrew Parlin
    Ophthalmology, Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Josh Oliver
    Emergency Medicine Department, Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Walter Steigleman
    Ophthalmology, Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Michael D April
    Emergency Medicine Department, Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Andrew Parlin, None; Josh Oliver, None; Walter Steigleman, None; Michael April, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 5548. doi:
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      Andrew Parlin, Josh Oliver, Walter Steigleman, Michael D April; Ophthalmology in the Emergency Department: A survey of Emergency Medicine Residents. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):5548.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The purpose of the study is to assess San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC) Emergency Medicine (EM) residents’ understanding of ophthalmology/ophthalmic emergencies. After graduating, most new Emergency Physicians will be practicing without the benefit of ophthalmology residents or support immediately available for consultation. This will be true in both small community military and civilian hospitals, and even more relevant while providing care in an austere deployed environment. This is especially true when considering the military’s rules for taking care of civilian patients in a deployed setting. These rules are referred to as medical rules of engagement (MEDROE) and limit care to civilians with threat to life, limb, or eyesight. This study could be used to assess if more ophthalmologic education/training needs to be instituted at SAMMC and other EM programs, as well as gauge progress within the residency

Methods : EM residents will undergo a test approved by the Ophthalmology department twice during the year—at both the beginning and ending of the academic year, to gauge progress of ophthalmic knowledge. Only second year residents have the opportunity to rotate within the ophthalmology department and the rotation is limited to two weeks. Testing biannually can provide objective data regarding the efficacy of this rotation, as well as the routine teaching that occurs within the emergency department. In addition to the test, residents will also fill out a survey containing a self-assessment of ophthalmic knowledge and exams skills/abilities, to include individual comfort in managing ophthalmic emergencies after graduation. During our first phase of data collection 31 residents completed the test and survey. We are expecting similar numbers at the end of the academic year.

Results : After the second round of testing, the data will be analyzed, and a comparison made between the different residency years, and between those who have and have not rotated through the ophthalmology department at SAMMC.

Conclusions : To be determined

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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