September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Visual acuity and clinical characteristics of adults with albinism.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael Nolan
    Ophthalmology and Visual Neurosciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • Raymond G. Areaux
    Ophthalmology and Visual Neurosciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • Ann Holleschau
    Ophthalmology and Visual Neurosciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • C Gail Summers
    Ophthalmology and Visual Neurosciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Michael Nolan, None; Raymond Areaux, None; Ann Holleschau, None; C Summers, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 5599. doi:
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      Michael Nolan, Raymond G. Areaux, Ann Holleschau, C Gail Summers; Visual acuity and clinical characteristics of adults with albinism.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):5599.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To examine the clinical characteristics and best corrected visual acuity in adults with albinism.

Methods : We reviewed the records of adult patients with confirmed diagnosis of ocular albinism or oculocutaneous albinism at the University of Minnesota genetics eye clinic. Patients with ocular pathology not related to albinism such as cataracts or corneal dystrophy were excluded from the analysis. Type of albinism, binocular-BCVA, glasses wear, iris pigment and macular transparency grade, and the presence of strabismus, nystagmus, and anomalous head posture were recorded.

Results : Forty-three patients met the inclusion criteria for the study. The mean age was 28 years old (range 18-55 years). The diagnoses of the patients included were OA type 1 (n=13), OCA type 1A (n=5), OCA type 1B (n=13), OCA type 2 (n=11), and OCA type 4 (n=1). The mean binocular BCVA was 20/66 at their most recent visit and ranged from 20/20 to 20/250. Refractive error as determined by cycloplegic refraction were mixed, and there was no consistent correlation between the type of albinism and myopia or hyperopia. Of the patients who were examined through childhood and into adulthood, there was a trend toward improved BCVA with age and refractive error correction.

Conclusions : There is a a variable in the severity of ocular characterisitcs and visual impairment in adults with albinism. This study adds further support to the idea that visual acuity improves with into adulthood, and that early correction of refractive error should be offered to patients with albinism.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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