September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Difference in intraocular pressure following involuntary switch from bimatoprost 0.03% to bimatoprost 0.01% in glaucoma patients.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kareem Moussa
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Jason L Chien
    School of Medicine and Health Sciences, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
  • Travis Porco
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Robert L Stamper
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Kareem Moussa, None; Jason Chien, None; Travis Porco, None; Robert Stamper, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 5623. doi:
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      Kareem Moussa, Jason L Chien, Travis Porco, Robert L Stamper; Difference in intraocular pressure following involuntary switch from bimatoprost 0.03% to bimatoprost 0.01% in glaucoma patients.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):5623.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To investigate the intraocular pressure lowering effect of bimatoprost 0.03% in comparison to bimatoprost 0.01% in eyes with a history of glaucoma

Methods : This study is a retrospective chart review. The charts of patients followed by UCSF glaucoma specialist Dr. Robert Stamper with a history of bimatoprost use were reviewed. In 2013, all patients on bimatoprost 0.03% were switched to bimatoprost 0.01%. The intraocular pressure measurements on at least two visits prior to the switch were compared to at least two, if not three, intraocular pressure measurements following the switch. Other data collected include age, gender, race, specific glaucoma diagnosis, most recent cup to disc ratio, most recent visual field index and mean deviation. Patients with a history of glaucoma drainage device insertion were excluded. Patients who underwent cataract extraction or selective laser trabeculoplasty during the data collection period were excluded. Patients who received intravitreal steroid or implant during the data collection period were also be excluded.

Results : A total of 48 eyes were included in the study. Using a linear mixed effects regression model, the difference in intraocular pressure after the switch from bimatoprost 0.03% to bimatoprost 0.01% was found to be 0.85mmHg. This was found to be statistically significant, with a p value of 0.02.

Conclusions : This study suggests that bimatoprost 0.01% had slightly less intraocular pressure lowering effect than bimatoprost 0.03%. This could be a small general effect, or perhaps a subgroup of patients may achieve a greater lowering effect on intraocular pressure with the higher concentration.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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