September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
The efficacy of MiBo Thermoflo in treatment of meibomian gland dysfunction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charles G Connor
    Rosenberg School of Optometry, University of the Incarnate Word, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Srihari Narayanan
    Rosenberg School of Optometry, University of the Incarnate Word, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • William L Miller
    Rosenberg School of Optometry, University of the Incarnate Word, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Charles Connor, None; Srihari Narayanan, None; William Miller, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 5678. doi:
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      Charles G Connor, Srihari Narayanan, William L Miller; The efficacy of MiBo Thermoflo in treatment of meibomian gland dysfunction. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):5678.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Eyelid warming with massage to enhance meibomian gland expression has been the backbone of managing Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD). Pain Point Medical has developed the MiBoFlo ThermoFlow (MIBO) as a new therapeutic approach for MGD related dry eye. The MIBO gently massages the outer area of the eyelids with continuous controlled heat. The procedure should help liquefy the secretions of the Meibomian glands resulting in thinner, clearer oils and reduced tear film evaporation. This study examines of the efficacy a single MIBO treatment on MGD.

Methods : Thirteen patients (8 male, 5 female; Average age 30+/- 9.49 yrs) with MGD were treated with MIBO for 12 minutes per eyelid. Only upper eyelids were treated per manufacturer protocol. Ultrasound gel was applied onto the heating pad of the MIBO which was then applied to the patient’s closed lids. The treatment does not require anesthesia. Baseline data included: OSDI questionnaire, MGD and Blepharitis scores based on the Effron Scale, TBUT and NITBUT as well as meniscus height. These measures were repeated 4 weeks later. The results were analyzed with a student T-test with post hoc test for significance.

Results : All thirteen patients reported immediate improvement in ocular comfort after treatment. The OSDI scores revealed a reduction in symptoms from 33.46+/-14.23 to 26.35+/-14.31. Both the MGD and Blepharitis scores showed statistically significant improvement 4 weeks post MIBO treatment. MGD improved significantly 0.88+/- 0.84 to 0.32+/- 0.61 (p=0.05). Blepharitis score improved significantly 0.96+/-0.19 to 0.65 +/- 0.65 (p=0.05). TBUT increased from 5.83 sec +/-2.3 to 6.61 +/- 1.64sec and the NITBUT increased from 9.31 sec+/- 6.5 to 11.34 +/- 5.59 sec. Tear meniscus rose from 0.25+/-0.04 to 0.31+/- 0.11.

Conclusions : MIBO treatment resulted in statistically significant improvement in the condition of the eyelids. MIBO treatment created an instantaneous feeling of comfort and “betterment of condition” in every patient. The manufacturer suggests 2 to 4 sets of treatment using the MIBO. We believe the other parameters tested did not reach statistical significance since the treatment was only performed once. MIBO treatment promises to be a useful adjunctive therapy to Omega 3 supplementation, lid exfoliation, lid scrubs and appears as effective as warm compresses in treatment of MGD.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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