September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) inhibits corneal inflammation in experimental rat keratoconjunctivitis sicca model
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jun-Sub Choi
    Catholic Institute for Visual Science, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Choun-Ki Joo
    Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
    Catholic Institute for Visual Science, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jun-Sub Choi, None; Choun-Ki Joo, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  This study was supported by a research grant of Pharma Research Products Company and a grant of the Korean Health Technology R&D Project, Ministry for Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea. (HI14C3417)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 5730. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Jun-Sub Choi, Choun-Ki Joo; Polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) inhibits corneal inflammation in experimental rat keratoconjunctivitis sicca model. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):5730.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Corneal inflammation is induced by various stimuli including infection, chemical burn and dry eye. The keratconjunctivitis scca (KCS) is the inflammatory ocular surface disease caused by eye dryness. The PDRN is a single strand DNA that extracted from salmon sperm. The polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) has the positive effect on tissue repair and stimulation of wound healing. This study was performed to investigate the therapeutic effect of PDRN in animal model for KCS.

Methods : SD rats (Male, 250g, 8 weeks, n=5) were used for this study. Keratoconjuctivitis sicca (KCS) was induced by atropine sulfate (1%) including bezalkonium chloride (BAK, 0.2%). The experimental KCS was induced from 1 week after topical treatment of atropine sulfate and BAK (2times/day). The PDRN eye drop (1mg/ml) was topically treated for 1 week (2times/day) after induction of KCS. At 2 weeks after induction of KCS, the eyes were enucleated for histological study and drug efficacy after corneal fluorescein staining. Corneal inflammation was confirmed by hematoxyline-eosin staining and immunostaing for inflammatory cells. The F4/80 and LSP-1 antibody for detection of inflammatory cells were used in this study.

Results : Topical atropine sulfate (1%) including BAK (0.2%) induced keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) in rat cornea. The polymorphonuclear cells were observed in vehicle treated cornea with kcs. And also, increased the F4/80 and LSP-1 positive cells were observed in vehicle treated cornea than normal cornea. However, the topical PDRN reduced the area of fluorescein staining in cornea with keratoconjunctivitis sicca. And also, increasing the F4/80 and LSP-1 positive cells was suppressed by treatment of topical PDRN.

Conclusions : In this study, we observed that corneal inflammation was inhibited by topical PDRN treatment in experimental keratoconjunctivitis scca. These results suggested that PDRN is able to inhibit corneal inflammation in patients with dry eye.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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