September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Inverse Finite Element Analysis of Mouse Lens Compression for Determining Elastic Moduli
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andre Cleaver
    Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Luis Rodriguez
    Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Matthew Aaron Reilly
    Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Andre Cleaver, None; Luis Rodriguez, None; Matthew Reilly, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant R25 GM060655
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 5743. doi:
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      Andre Cleaver, Luis Rodriguez, Matthew Aaron Reilly; Inverse Finite Element Analysis of Mouse Lens Compression for Determining Elastic Moduli. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):5743.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Presbyopia is the gradual loss of accommodation ability with age. This is generally thought to be due to age-related lens stiffening. Compression testing has been used to evaluate lens stiffness; however, stiffness is an extrinsic metric as it is affected by size, shape, and mechanical heterogeneity. Thus, stiffness is not a reliable metric for comparing lenses of different genotypes or ages. To overcome this difficulty, an inverse finite element analysis of a compression test was used to determine the elastic modulus (an intrinsic measurement of stiffness) of the lens.

Methods : A 17-week-old mouse lens was evaluated using compression testing. The dimensional values of the lens were assigned from photographs of the lens collected during the experiment. Inverse finite element analysis was used to estimate and determine the elastic moduli of the nucleus, cortex, and capsule by comparing the experimental force-displacement data with the model-predicted force-displacement relationship up to 10% axial compression.

Results : Preliminary results show a similar positive trend in both the experimental and computer-simulated data with estimated values of 57 kPa, 39 kPa, and 48 kPa respectively. Additional mechanical tests were used to independently confirm the elastic moduli of the lens capsule and nucleus.

Conclusions : Identifying the corresponding mechanical properties of lenses from mice having various lens-specific genotypes will provide better insight on how specific proteins contribute to developing presbyopia.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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