September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Characterization of hESC-derived retinal tissues in long-term cultures
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Wei Liu
    Albert Einstein College of Med, New York, New York, United States
  • Albert Lowe
    Albert Einstein College of Med, New York, New York, United States
  • Raven Harris
    Albert Einstein College of Med, New York, New York, United States
  • Punita Bhansali
    Albert Einstein College of Med, New York, New York, United States
  • Ales Cvekl
    Albert Einstein College of Med, New York, New York, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Wei Liu, None; Albert Lowe, None; Raven Harris, None; Punita Bhansali, None; Ales Cvekl, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH grant 1R01EY022645; American Health Assistance Foundation (AHAF; now is named as BrightFocus Foundation), M2012044; RPB unrestricted grant
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 6067. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Wei Liu, Albert Lowe, Raven Harris, Punita Bhansali, Ales Cvekl; Characterization of hESC-derived retinal tissues in long-term cultures. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):6067.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : This study aims to characterize hESC-derived retinal tissues in long-term cultures.

Methods : Undifferentiated H1 hESCs were cultured on Matrigel-coated plates in mTeSR medium and passaged every 5 to 7 days with Dispase or ReLeSR. Retinal differentiation was performed with a modified Matrigel-based method. The hESC-derived retinal tissues were cultured in DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with 10% FBS and B27, and were characterized with immunohistochemistry and electronic microscopy.

Results : The retinal tissues in long-term cultures displayed as a laminar structure with all retinal cell types. The retinal cells were identified by immunohistochemistry with these markers: ISLET1/2 and BRN3 for ganglion cells, Tuj1 for ganglion cells and amacrine cells, Syntaxin for amacrine cells, Calbindin 28k for horizontal cells, PKCalpha for bipolar cells, RCVRN for photoreceptor cells, and Gutamine synthetase and LHX2 for Müller glial cells. The photoreceptor cells highly expressed RHO, L/M-Opsin, and S-Opsin. Importantly, the inner and outer segments of the photoreceptor cells in the retinal tissues were identified by the characteristic ultrastructures in electronic microscopy.

Conclusions : Our retinal differentiation system is capable of generating retinal tissues resembling human retinae and thus could be useful in stem cell-based research and applications for retinal disease.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×