September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Canine corneal squamous cell carcinoma: A pathological review of 122 cases
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard R Dubielzig
    Pathobiological Sciences, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Leandro B.C. Teixeira
    Pathobiological Sciences, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Richard Dubielzig, None; Leandro Teixeira, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 6218. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Richard R Dubielzig, Leandro B.C. Teixeira; Canine corneal squamous cell carcinoma: A pathological review of 122 cases. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):6218.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : We document the occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma or carcinoma in-situ confined to the cornea in 122 dogs and we discuss the risk factors.

Methods : The database of the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin includes 12,865 dogs in which neoplasia was diagnosed. The search terms squamous cell carcinoma or carcinoma in-situ along with the location cornea. Cases where the tumor was not confined to the cornea were excluded.

Results : 112 of these cases were in pure breed dogs and all but 13 of those were in brachycephalic breeds (99/112 or 88%). 49 cases (40%) of all cases were in Pug dogs. Characteristically, canine corneal SCC occurs in the axial cornea and is only superficially invasive. They are successfully treated by lamellar keratectomy. All affected had preexisting chronic keratitis and most were being treated with cyclosporine or tacrolimus

Conclusions : Corneal squamous cell carcinoma is seen in brachycephalic breeds, especially Pugs. Dogs have a prior history of chronic keratitis and usually treatment with cyclosporin or tacrolimus. The tumor is superficial and can usually be treated by lamellar keratectomy.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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