September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
American Major Dietary Patterns and Age-related Cataract
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Chung-Jung Chiu
    United States Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Department of Ophthalmology School of Medicine, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Gary Gensler
    Age-Related Eye Disease Study Coordinating Center, The Emmes Corporation, Rockville, Maryland, United States
  • Allen Taylor
    United States Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Department of Ophthalmology School of Medicine, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Chung-Jung Chiu, None; Gary Gensler, None; Allen Taylor, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH RO1EY021826, RO1EY013250, RO1EY021212, and USDA 1950-5100-060-01A
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 6220. doi:
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      Chung-Jung Chiu, Gary Gensler, Allen Taylor; American Major Dietary Patterns and Age-related Cataract. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):6220.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : We aimed to evaluate the associations between major American dietary patterns and risk for cortical and nuclear cataract.

Methods : Dietary consumption data of 37 food groups were collected by a 90-item Block food frequency questionnaire administered at the baseline Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS). Using the AREDS System for Classifying Cataracts, 2007 eyes with pure nuclear lens opacity, 1281 eyes with pure cortical opacity, and 2491 eyes without lens opacity were identified from 7,575 eligible eyes. Associations between dietary patterns and pure lens opacities were examined by using the generalized estimating approach to logistic regression.

Results : Two major dietary patterns were identified by principle component analysis and named Oriental and Western patterns. The Oriental pattern was characterized by higher intake of vegetables, legumes, fruit, whole grains, tomatoes, and seafood. The Western pattern was characterized by higher intake of red meat, processed meat, high-fat dairy products, French fries, refined grains, and eggs. We ranked our participants according to how closely their diets line up with the two patterns by calculating the two pattern scores for each participant. For all nuclear opacity (grade >2; approximately equivalent to LOCS III grades 3.0-3.9), the multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (OR) comparing the highest to lowest tertile of the Western pattern score was 1.36 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-1.76; Ptrend=0.03), and for mild nuclear opacity (grade <4 but >2; approximately equivalent to LOCS III grades <5.0-6.4 but >3.0-3.9) the OR was 1.45 (1.12-1.89; Ptrend=0.01). No other significant associations were noted.

Conclusions : Our data indicate that consuming a Western dietary pattern is significantly associated with increased odds of early nuclear opacity.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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