September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Predictors of patient satisfaction following cataract surgery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vu Quang Do
    Injury, The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Lisa J Keay
    Injury, The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Anna Palagyi
    Injury, The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Fiona Stapleton
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Jan Steen
    Ophthalmology Network, Agency for Clinical Innovation, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Andrew JR White
    Save Sight Institute, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Westmead hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Peter J McCluskey
    Save Sight Institute, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Vu Do, None; Lisa Keay, None; Anna Palagyi, None; Fiona Stapleton, None; Jan Steen, None; Andrew White, None; Peter McCluskey, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NSW ACI Project Grant
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 6231. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Vu Quang Do, Lisa J Keay, Anna Palagyi, Fiona Stapleton, Jan Steen, Andrew JR White, Peter J McCluskey; Predictors of patient satisfaction following cataract surgery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):6231.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The patient’s perspective on vision following cataract surgery is important in defining surgical success, however little is known about the relationship between satisfaction with post-operative vision and preoperative vision status. A prospective cohort study was performed to determine whether preoperative factors were predictive of dissatisfaction with vision following cataract surgery.

Methods : Bilateral cataract patients (aged 50 years and older) scheduled for their first-eye cataract surgery were recruited at four metropolitan NSW public hospitals. Patients with significant comorbidities that were considered to impact surgical outcome, such as advanced glaucoma, amblyopia, dementia, stroke or Parkinson’s disease, were excluded. Participants were assessed prior to first-eye surgery and 3-months after surgery. We used logistic regression to investigate the impact of pre-operative visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, stereopsis, spherical ametropia, astigmatism, distance spectacle dependence, residual refractive error, driving status and self-reported visual disability (Catquest 9SF, rescaled 0-100) on dissatisfaction with postoperative vision.

Results : The mean age of participants was 72 ±8 years (mean ± SD), with the majority were female (53%, n=78/147). Mean bilateral visual acuity was 0.24 ±0.2 logMAR (mean ± SD) and median bilateral log contrast sensitivity was 1.56 (IQR: 1.40-1.68) prior to cataract extraction. One in every five participants (n=30) were dissatisfied with their first-eye cataract surgery. Pre-operative patient-reported visual disability (χ2= 8.20, 1 DF, p=0.004) and 2 dioptres of more astigmatism (χ2=4.05, 1 DF, p=0.044) were found to be independently predictive of postoperative vision dissatisfaction. For every 10 units increase in visual disability, the risk of dissatisfaction with postoperative vision increased by 64% (OR=1.64, 95%CI: 1.17 to 2.3). Those with high astigmatism were 2.6 times more likely to be dissatisfied with vision postoperatively (OR=2.6, 95%CI: 1.03 to 6.63).

Conclusions : This study suggests that patients with complex pre-operative refractive errors such as high astigmatism may be more likely to be dissatisfied with their vision post-operatively. Patient-reported visual disability, rather than more commonly used objective measures of vision was associated with post-operative dissatisfaction with vision.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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