September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Adaptive optics and its correlation with multimodal imaging and microperimetry in patients with macular capillary loss
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rodrigo Jorge
    University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil
  • Felipe Placeres Borges
    University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil
  • Murilo Wendeborn Rodrigues
    University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil
  • Ingrid U Scott
    Departments of Ophthalmology and Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Rubens C Siqueira
    University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Rodrigo Jorge, None; Felipe Borges, None; Murilo Rodrigues, None; Ingrid Scott, None; Rubens Siqueira, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  CNPq 301326/2011-8
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 6317. doi:
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      Rodrigo Jorge, Felipe Placeres Borges, Murilo Wendeborn Rodrigues, Ingrid U Scott, Rubens C Siqueira; Adaptive optics and its correlation with multimodal imaging and microperimetry in patients with macular capillary loss. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):6317.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Purpose: To correlate adaptive optics photoreceptors arrangement findings with other anatomical and functional exams in patients with macular capillary loss.

Methods : Four patients underwent comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation including anatomical (Color fundus pictures, multimodal and adapative optics retinal imaging) and functional ( microperimetry) exams. Cone packing was assessed by AO and confronted with the exams findings.

Results : In ischemic maculas, distribution was uneven and tends to be greater close to vessels. Cone density was lower overall, but specially in less perfused areas on FA. Adaptive optics could recognize photoreceptor damage in normo-reflective OCT- ellipsoid band. In advanced disease, places where AO couldn’t recognize any cell, there were measurable visual function

Conclusions : Adaptive optics showed that the macular cone density was lower than normal even outside the more ischemic areas, even when ellipsoid zone remained preserved on OCT. Cone density can be near normal adjacent to vessels, what could indicate a role of the retinal vasculature in photoreceptor maintenance. Adaptive Optics imaging showed to be more reliable when assessing patients with good visual acuity.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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