September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Central corneal thickness and intraocular pressure between dominant and non-dominant eyes in adult patients with glaucoma
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nadia Hua
    McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    St. Josephs Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  • Sharnjit Bains
    McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    St. Josephs Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  • Enitan Sogbesan
    McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    St. Josephs Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Nadia Hua, None; Sharnjit Bains, None; Enitan Sogbesan, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  McMaster University Surgical Association Grant
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 6471. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Nadia Hua, Sharnjit Bains, Enitan Sogbesan; Central corneal thickness and intraocular pressure between dominant and non-dominant eyes in adult patients with glaucoma. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):6471.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The goal of risk assessment for glaucoma is to identify patients at greatest risk for symptomatic vision loss and who are most likely to benefit from early treatment. The purpose of this study is to determine whether ocular dominance is associated with important glaucoma risk factors such as intraocular pressures (IOP) and central corneal thickness (CCT).

Methods : 117 glaucoma patients were recruited and consented. Participants completed standardized ophthalmological assessment including IOP using the Goldmann applanation tonometer and CCT was measured using the Reichert handheld Pachymeter. Ocular dominance was determined using the Dolman Test (hole-in-the-card). The data was statistically analyzed using SPSS Software.

Results : Participants mean age was 67.1±11.1 years, with 37% male, 63% female, and predominantly Caucasian population. Ocular dominance assessed using Dolman test showed 59% were right-eye dominant and 41% were left eye-dominant. Average IOP in all patients was greater in the non-dominant eye (20.5±7.6) than the dominant eye (19.2±5.5) by a difference of 1.30±6.9, demonstrating statistical significance (p=0.04). Average IOP for patients with a dominant right eye (n=69) was 19.6±5.3 and was 18.5±5.8 in the dominant left eye (n=48). Females tended to have higher IOP overall continuing the higher trend in the non-dominant eye (21.4±7.9) than the dominant eye (19.4±5.4). Average CCT for all patients was greater in the non-dominant eye (565.9±42.3) than the dominant eye (564.9±49.6) by 1.0±37.9, however this is not statistically significant (p=0.78). Average CCT in the dominant right eye was 568.9±44.0 and was 561.3±57.5 in the dominant left eye. CCT measurements were variable between the two eyes for gender and showed no statistical significance.

Conclusions : The non-dominant eye demonstrates significantly higher IOP and CCT measurements than the dominant eye in this study population. Among the dominant eyes, these parameters were higher in the right eye than the left eye. The lower IOP and CCT in the dominant eye may demonstrate a protective effect in the dominant eye for glaucoma development and progression. The study also showed the effect of thicker CCT on higher IOP measurements among the study population in both the dominant and non-dominant eyes. However, further studies are needed to confirm these observations.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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