September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Fiberoptic Partial Coherence Interferometry (PCI): A Novel Approach to Locate Schlemm’s Canal for MIGS Surgery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas Bende
    University Hospital Tuebingen, Moessingen, Germany
  • Haroun Al-Mohamedi
    University Hospital Tuebingen, Moessingen, Germany
  • Bianca Schäfer
    University Hospital Tuebingen, Moessingen, Germany
  • Theo Oltrup
    University Hospital Tuebingen, Moessingen, Germany
  • Guido Mieskes
    University Hospital Tuebingen, Moessingen, Germany
  • Martin Leitritz
    University Hospital Tuebingen, Moessingen, Germany
  • Michael S. Berlin
    Glaucoma Institute of Beverly Hills & Jules Stein Eye Institute, UCLA, , Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Thomas Bende, None; Haroun Al-Mohamedi, None; Bianca Schäfer, None; Theo Oltrup, None; Guido Mieskes, None; Martin Leitritz, None; Michael S. Berlin, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 6505. doi:
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      Thomas Bende, Haroun Al-Mohamedi, Bianca Schäfer, Theo Oltrup, Guido Mieskes, Martin Leitritz, Michael S. Berlin; Fiberoptic Partial Coherence Interferometry (PCI): A Novel Approach to Locate Schlemm’s Canal for MIGS Surgery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):6505.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Feasibility study for targeting Schlemm’s canal (SC) and overlying trabecular meshwork from across the anterior chamber without a goniolens or contrast agent by using an infrared laser based fiberoptic PCI to enable goniolens free Excimer Laser Trabeculostomy (ELT) MIGS surgery.

Methods : After determining the wavelength with the greatest transmission through the sclera of porcine eyes was determined by spectroscopy, an apparatus was built. This device uses a laser based time domain (TD)PCI-interferometer, driven by a linear motor (PI-type M-663) with a spatial resolution of 0.1 μm in the reference path and a GRIN fiber (GIF625-10, Ø62.5 µm Core,Ø125 µm Cladding, 0.275 NA,) in the measuring path, a SLD (1300nm) with a bandwidth of 85nm and a detector, all of which were linked via computer. A model was then created to simulate SC within sclera: a piece of fresh porcine sclera was split and a spread of oil was inserted within the split sclera. This sclera/oil /sclera sandwich was then evaluated from varying distances with the apparatus to determine whether the tissue borders could be identified. The system was optimized by a polarization controller in the measuring path and various means of focusing and collimating the laser light.

Results : The wavelength with the greatest transmission through the sclera is +/- 1300 nm. The SNR was 68dB, the measuring depth averaged 18mm and the resolution was 9µm. All surfaces of scleral sandwich are clearly detectable.

Conclusions : Schlemm’s canal location distal to the trabecular meshwork could be feasibly determined from within the eye by fiberoptic PCI. Improving the SNR will better enable such tissue recognition and localization in a human eye.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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