October 2016
Volume 57, Issue 13
Open Access
Letters to the Editor  |   October 2016
The Influence of Age on Crystalline Lens Power Calculations
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jos J. Rozema
    Department of Ophthalmology, Antwerp University Hospital, Edegem, Belgium;
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Antwerp University, Wilrijk, Belgium; and the
  • David A. Atchison
    School of Optometry and Vision Sciences and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 2016, Vol.57, 5435. doi:10.1167/iovs.16-20444
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      Jos J. Rozema, David A. Atchison; The Influence of Age on Crystalline Lens Power Calculations. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(13):5435. doi: 10.1167/iovs.16-20444.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Several years ago we optimized the constants of three previously published lens power calculation methods (Bennett, Bennett-Rabbetts, and Stenström) using measured biometry and phakometry data.1 Given the well-known tendency of the lens to increase its thickness and curvature with age, while at the same time reducing its equivalent refractive index,2 it is conceivable that the constants used in these lens power calculations may have to be adjusted for age as well. To investigate this, we used the same cohort of 66 emmetropic eyes of 66 subjects (aged 19–69 years) from our previous works.1,2 
As before, we determined the lens power constants for each eye individually, both in case the lens power was calculated using only the anterior corneal surface1 and using the total corneal power,3,4 and considered how these constants change with age. This demonstrated that all lens power constants had weak, but significant, correlation with age (Table). However, adjusting the lens power calculations to these age-dependent constants produced only minor improvements in the correlation with the lens power determined with phakometry, with a maximum of +0.01 for the Bennett-Rabbetts method. In adults, systematically including age correction to lens power calculations will therefore not lead to a meaningful improvement in accuracy with respect to the values determined by phakometry. 
Table
 
Descriptive Statistics of the Individually Customized Constants for the Lens Power Calculation Methods, Along With Their Correlation and Regression With Age
Table
 
Descriptive Statistics of the Individually Customized Constants for the Lens Power Calculation Methods, Along With Their Correlation and Regression With Age
References
Rozema JJ, Atchison DA, Tassignon M-J. Comparing methods to estimate the human lens power [published correction appears in Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012;53:1151]. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2011; 52: 7937–7942.
Atchison DA, Markwell EL, Kasthurirangan S, Pope JM, Smith G, Swann PG. Age-related changes in optical and biometric characteristics of emmetropic eyes. J Vis. 2008; 8(4): 29.
Jongenelen S, Rozema JJ, Tassignon M-J. Distribution of the crystalline lens power in vivo as a function of age. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2015; 56: 7029–7035.
Hernandez VM, Cabot F, Ruggeri M, et al. Calculation of crystalline lens power using a modification of the Bennett method. Biomed Opt Exp. 2015; 6: 4501–4515.
Table
 
Descriptive Statistics of the Individually Customized Constants for the Lens Power Calculation Methods, Along With Their Correlation and Regression With Age
Table
 
Descriptive Statistics of the Individually Customized Constants for the Lens Power Calculation Methods, Along With Their Correlation and Regression With Age
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