June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
The Amish Eye Study: Baseline Quantitative Ocular Characteristics on a Unique Cohort
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jonathan L Haines
    Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Nicole Restrepo
    Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Yeunjoo Song
    Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Renee Laux
    Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Larry Deon Adams
    Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Denise Fuzzell
    Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Laura J Caywood
    Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Violet Horst
    Ophthalmology and Genetics, University of Pennsylvania, Phiiladelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Tine MacKay
    Ophthalmology and Genetics, University of Pennsylvania, Phiiladelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Debbie Dana
    Ophthalmology and Genetics, University of Pennsylvania, Phiiladelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Muneeswar Gupta Nittala
    Doheny Image Reading Center, Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Srinivas R Sadda
    Doheny Image Reading Center, Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California, United States
    Ophthalmology, University of California, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • William K Scott
    Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Dwight Stambolian
    Ophthalmology and Genetics, University of Pennsylvania, Phiiladelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Margaret A Pericak-Vance
    Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jonathan Haines, None; Nicole Restrepo, None; Yeunjoo Song, None; Renee Laux, None; Larry Adams, None; Denise Fuzzell, None; Laura Caywood, None; Violet Horst, None; Tine MacKay, None; Debbie Dana, None; Muneeswar Nittala, None; Srinivas Sadda, None; William Scott, None; Dwight Stambolian, None; Margaret Pericak-Vance, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  EY012118 EY023164
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 188. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Jonathan L Haines, Nicole Restrepo, Yeunjoo Song, Renee Laux, Larry Deon Adams, Denise Fuzzell, Laura J Caywood, Violet Horst, Tine MacKay, Debbie Dana, Muneeswar Gupta Nittala, Srinivas R Sadda, William K Scott, Dwight Stambolian, Margaret A Pericak-Vance; The Amish Eye Study: Baseline Quantitative Ocular Characteristics on a Unique Cohort. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):188.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : To measure and describe the baseline quantitative ocular characteristics of an elderly Amish population, which can be used as endophenotypes for studies of the architecture of ocular health.

Methods : 1,081 related individuals were recruited from Amish families ascertained for early/intermediate AMD in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Indiana. All participants underwent a health history and ophthalmologic exam including color fundus photography, infrared imaging, and SD-OCT scans. AMD pedigrees were ascertained based on diagnosis of ≥ 1 person with AMD. Individual eyes (total = 2,122) were graded based on a simplified Age Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) scale of 0-5. Right and left eye measures were highly correlated r2=0.79-0.96 [p=0.0001]. Summary statistics were generated and one-way ANOVA and two-tailed t-tests calculated via Stata 14.

Results : On average participants were in their mid-60’s {mean (SD)} [age=65.3 yrs (10.8)] with prehypertension [systolic blood pressure (bp)=132 mmHg (19.8); diastolic bp=76.3 (12.0)]. Participants overall had a refraction sphere of 0.34 (2.4) diopters (D), refraction cylinder of 0.34 (1.1) D, and visual acuity of 20/26.7 (42.0). Of the 1,081participants, 85.5% had early to no signs of AMD (AREDS=0-2) and 14.5% had intermediate/late AMD (AREDS=3, 4, & 5). AMD cases were older [age = 73.7 yrs (9.4); p<0.0001], more farsighted [refraction sphere=0.71 vs. 0.21 D; p=0.001], and suffered a higher degree of presbyopia [added magnifying power = 2.69 vs. 2.30; p<0.0001]. Sex did not contribute to differences in these traits (p > 0.05) although age modified added magnifying power in unaffected participants and for refraction sphere regardless of AMD status (p<0.0001). Additionally, AMD cases and unaffected participants did not have appreciable differences in intraocular pressure (15.0 vs. 15.6 mmHg) or cup-to-disk ratios (0.36 vs. 0.39).

Conclusions : We describe the baseline quantitative ocular traits of a multi-state Amish cohort ascertained for AMD. As expected age modifies risk of AMD and separately modifies magnifying power and refraction sphere. Although sex has been identified as a risk factor for AMD in other studies, we did not see an association in this study. Refraction traits are known risk factors for myopia but little has been done to explore their potential role in AMD. Further studies may help tease apart underlying risk factors contributing to complex, ocular diseases.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×