June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Treatment outcomes of chronic central serous retinopathy in women compared to men
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel Cherfan
    Ophthalmology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Rishi P Singh
    Ophthalmology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Fabiana Queiroga de Paula Araujo Silva
    Ophthalmology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Felipe Conti
    Ophthalmology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Daniel Cherfan, None; Rishi Singh, Alcon (F), Apellis (F), Genentech (C), Genentech (F), Optos (C), Regeneron (C), Regeneron (F), Shire (C), Zeiss (C); Fabiana Silva, None; Felipe Conti, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 219. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Daniel Cherfan, Rishi P Singh, Fabiana Queiroga de Paula Araujo Silva, Felipe Conti; Treatment outcomes of chronic central serous retinopathy in women compared to men. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):219.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR), in its chronic form (cCSCR), is a vision threatening condition and is 6 times more common in men. Management of cCSCR varies from localized treatment to systemic therapies. The aim of this study is to report the treatment outcomes of CSCR in women compared to men by assessing retinal morphological changes by spectral domain ocular coherence tomography (SDOCT) and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at different time points.

Methods : A retrospective analysis was performed based on data acquired from the Cole Eye Institute. Patients that carried a diagnosis of cCSCR, defined as the persistence or recurrence of subretinal fluid for >4 months, and at least 12 months of follow-up were included in the study. Collected data included demographic details, BCVA at presentation and follow up visits up to 12 months, and central subfield changes (CST) by SDOCT.

Results : Forty-three eyes of 37 patients (18 female and 19 male) were included. The average age for females and males was 62.67±12.17 years and 58.9±13.17 years (p= 0.38). Baseline BCVA for females was 71.21±16.28 ETDRS letters (20/40) compared to 76.02±8.39 ETDRS letters (20/30) in males (p= 0.25) with initial CST of 388.52±108.61 μm and 378.40±117.66 μm in each group respectively (p=0.78). The average BCVA in treated females was 70.00±18.53 (20/40) at 6 months and 74.18 ±16.20 (20/30) letters at 12 months, while in treated males was 77.48 ±8.38 letters (20/30) and 78.57±8.33 letters (20/25) at 6 and 12 months respectively (p= 0.19 and p= 0.38). The average BCVA in non-treated females was 79.41 ±5.71 (20/25) and 80.45 ±3.94 (20/25) at 6 and 12 months while that in non-treated males was 76.24 ±9.34 (20/30) and 82.725±3.74 (20/25)(p= 0.49 and p =0.33). The CST in treated females was 287.38 ±75.60 μm and 309.92 ±100.13 μm at 6 and 12 months and CST in treated males was 297.63 ±56.08 μm and 295 ± 52.66 μm at the selected time points (p=0.69 and p= 0.62). CST in non-treated females was 294.67±59.84 μm at 6 months and 261.5 ±47.54 μm at 12 months while that in non-treated males was 309.5±97.61 μm and 323 ±119.50 μm at 6 and 12 months (p= 0.76 and p= 0.28).

Conclusions : Preliminary results of the study do not support any significant differences in cCSCR outcomes between treated and non-treated men and women. Further studies would be beneficial to determine whether there are gender differences to treatments when managing cCSCR.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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