June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Habitat and predatory behaviour are related with ratio of nuclear layers thickness and cone pedicle spinules in teleosts retinas
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joaquin De Juan
    Dept Biotecnologia, Universidad de Alicante, San Vicente Del Raspeig, Spain
  • Noemi Martínez-Ruiz
    Dept Biotecnologia, Universidad de Alicante, San Vicente Del Raspeig, Spain
  • Bassima Boughlala
    Dept Biotecnologia, Universidad de Alicante, San Vicente Del Raspeig, Spain
  • Alba De Juan
    Dept Biotecnologia, Universidad de Alicante, San Vicente Del Raspeig, Spain
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Joaquin De Juan, None; Noemi Martínez-Ruiz, None; Bassima Boughlala, None; Alba De Juan, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Vicerrectorado de Investigación, University of Alicante, Spain (Vigrob-137)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 357. doi:
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      Joaquin De Juan, Noemi Martínez-Ruiz, Bassima Boughlala, Alba De Juan; Habitat and predatory behaviour are related with ratio of nuclear layers thickness and cone pedicle spinules in teleosts retinas. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):357.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Teleosts constitute more than 50% of all vertebrate species and have a wide distribution in all types. Adaptation of teleosts retina to the environment is not only according to its taxon of belonging. These data makes them an important experimental model for studying the adaptation to different environmental conditions and its relationship with predatory behaviour. The aim of this work is to establish the relationship between the predatory behaviour and the thickness of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and the inner nuclear layer (INL), in twelve species from six teleosts families.

Methods : Retinas from twelve species of teleost belonging to following families: Moronidae (D. labrax; D. punctatus; M. Americana), Sparidae (S. aurata; D. vulgaris; P. acarne), Labridae (C. julis; S. tinca; S. roissali), Scianidae (A. regius), Centrarchidae (M. salmoides) and Cyprinidae (C. carpio) were studied. Previously to the sacrifice, fishes were adapted during two hours in light. Retinas were removed, fixed and embedded in Epon-82 resin; then one-micron sections were stained with toluidine blue and the thicknesses of the two nuclear retinal layers were measured and its ratio ONL/INL obtained. Thin sections were observed under transmission electron microscope and the spinules number per pedicle counted. The data were analysed using an ANOVA. The habitat and predatory data were obtained from FishBase and several publications.

Results : The ratio between the two nuclear layers shows a positive and significant correlation with the piscivorous data, but, it does not correlate significantly with the trophic habit level. ONL/INL ratio is lower in the diurnal fishes and in those fewer predators. The data suggest that ONL/INL ratio is a potent indicator to classify the fish according to its predatory behaviours. Therefore, this ratio could be used as an indicator of the predatory behaviour of different teleosts species. The spinules are scarce in diurnal and little predatory species. In species with a level of predation and piscivorous intermediates some spinules is slightly higher. Finally, in highly ichthyophagous species, spinules appear in a larger number.

Conclusions : The thickness of the layers of the retina, especially the ONL/INL ratio, and the number of spindles per pedicle, are significant predictors of the predatory behaviour of teleosts.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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