June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Frequency of a diagnosis of glaucoma in individuals who consume coffee, tea, and/or soft drinks
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Connie Wu
    Ophthalmology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
  • Annie Wu
    Ophthalmology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
  • Victoria Tseng
    Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, United States
    Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Fei Yu
    Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, United States
    Department of Biostatistics, Fielding School of Public Health at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Anne Coleman
    Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, United States
    Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Connie Wu, None; Annie Wu, None; Victoria Tseng, None; Fei Yu, None; Anne Coleman, Aerie (C), Alcon (C)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 3709. doi:
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      Connie Wu, Annie Wu, Victoria Tseng, Fei Yu, Anne Coleman; Frequency of a diagnosis of glaucoma in individuals who consume coffee, tea, and/or soft drinks. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):3709.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To evaluate the association between consumption of coffee, tea, or soft drinks and glaucoma in participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

Methods : This retrospective cross-sectional study examined the association between consumption of coffee, tea, or soft drinks and glaucoma in 2005-2006 NHANES participants. Participants with optic disc photographs and FDT visual fields available in the 2005–2006 NHANES sample were included in the study. Participants with the following characteristics were excluded: (1) missing optic disc photographs or FDT visual fields; (2) age <40 years, because optic disc photographs and FDT visual fields were not collected for participants under age 40; and (3) documented alternative explanation for cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) findings (dysplastic disc or marked anisometropia) or for a visual field defect (retinal vascular disease, macular degeneration, or cerebrovascular disease). The exposures of interest were caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, iced tea, hot tea, and soft drinks. The outcome of interest was a clinical diagnosis of glaucoma based on the Rotterdam criteria. Logistic regression modeling was performed to assess the association between the frequency of consumption of each type of beverage and glaucoma, while controlling for age, body mass index, gender, ethnicity, smoking status, and diabetes. All estimates were weighted based on the multistage NHANES sampling design.

Results : Among a total of 1678 survey participants who met the inclusion criteria, the overall prevalence of glaucoma was 5.0% (n = 84) with a weighted prevalence of 3.2% (n = 2,657,336). The majority of participants were non-Hispanic white (n = 892; 53.2%). There were no statistically significant associations between consumption of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, iced tea, and soft drinks and glaucoma. Participants who consumed at least one cup of caffeinated hot tea daily were 0.26 times as likely to have glaucoma compared to those who did not consume caffeinated hot tea (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.26; 95% CI = 0.09, 0.72); however, no statistically significant association existed for decaffeinated hot tea and glaucoma (OR = 0.85; 95% CI = 0.23, 3.23).

Conclusions : In NHANES, participants who consumed caffeinated hot tea daily were less likely to have glaucoma than those who did not consume hot tea. Further research into this finding is warranted.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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