June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Congenital Zika Syndrome: Visual Impairment in Children with Ocular and Neurological Findings
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Camila V. Ventura
    Ophthalmology, Altino Ventura Foundation, Miami, Florida, United States
    Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Liana O. Ventura
    Ophthalmology, Altino Ventura Foundation, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Linda Lawrence
    Privante Practice, Salina, Kansas, United States
  • Marilyn T Miller
    Ophthalmology, University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Camila Ventura, None; Liana Ventura, None; Linda Lawrence, None; Marilyn Miller, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 4717. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Camila V. Ventura, Liana O. Ventura, Linda Lawrence, Marilyn T Miller; Congenital Zika Syndrome: Visual Impairment in Children with Ocular and Neurological Findings. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):4717.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To describe the visual impairment associated with ocular and neurological abnormalities in a cohort of children with congenital Zika syndrome (CZS).

Methods : This prospective cross-sectional study included infants with microcephaly born in Pernambuco, Brazil, May to December 2015. Immunoglobulin M antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the Zika virus (ZIKV) on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples was positive for all infants. Clinical evaluation consisted of comprehensive ophthalmologic examination including functional vision assessment, neurologic exam, and neuroimaging.

Results : Thirty-two infants (mean age at exam 5.7 ± 0.9 months [range, 4.5 to 7.4 months]) were included in the study, from which 18 were male (56.3%). Visual function could not be tested in one (3.1%) of the 32 infants. Visual impairment, including nonattainment of visual milestones, was detected in 30 of the 31 infants (96.8%). Ocular findings were observed in 14 patients (43.8%). All patients (100%) demonstrated neurological and neuroimaging abnormalities, of which four (12.5%) did not present microcephaly at birth, only later.

Conclusions : Most children with CZS demonstrated severe visual impairment. More than half presented cerebral visual impairment, characterized by visual impairment as a consequence of the neurological involvement, regardless of ocular findings.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

Baby with Congenital Zika Syndrome being assessed.

Baby with Congenital Zika Syndrome being assessed.

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