June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Viewing Video with Homonymous Hemianopia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Francisco Costela
    Opthalmology, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Daniel R Saunders
    Opthalmology, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Sidika Kajtezovic
    Opthalmology, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Dylan J Rose
    Opthalmology, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Sarah S Sheldon
    Opthalmology, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Russell L Woods
    Opthalmology, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Francisco Costela, U.S. Provisional Application No. 62460156 (P); Daniel Saunders, Schepens Eye Research Institute (P); Sidika Kajtezovic, None; Dylan Rose, Schepens Eye Research Institute (P); Sarah Sheldon, None; Russell Woods, Schepens Eye Research Institute (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant EY019100
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 2484. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Francisco Costela, Daniel R Saunders, Sidika Kajtezovic, Dylan J Rose, Sarah S Sheldon, Russell L Woods; Viewing Video with Homonymous Hemianopia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):2484.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : In three studies, we (1) characterized the reported difficulty of people with homonymous hemianopia while watching TV, (2) objectively measured the difficulty, and (3) propose and tested a novel rehabilitation aid.

Methods : (1) We conducted a survey about watching TV and movies with subjects with normal vision (N=193) or hemianopia (N=93). (2) We measured the ability to follow the story in video clips in a subset from both groups (N=60, 20, respectively), using a novel information acquisition (IA) measure that uses natural language processing to objectively scoring the subject’s descriptions of the clips (ability to follow the story). (3) The IA of subjects with hemianopia (N=17) was compared when viewing the videos with or without a superimposed dynamic cue that we called a content guide (see figure 1B), calculated from the gaze of subjects with normal vision (figure 1A).

Results : (1) Subjects with hemianopia were more likely to report difficulty watching TV, movies on a computer, and movies at the theater, and were less likely to take photographs or attend the theater, because of vision difficulties. (2) The hemianopia group had a significantly lower IA score, average 3.0, compared to 4.3 shared words of the normal-vision group (mixed-effects regression, z=4.52, p<0.001). (3) Presence of the content guide significantly increased the IA score by 0.54 shared words (z=4.67, p<0.001), and was higher in most (14/17) of the subjects with hemianopia.

Conclusions : In addition to reporting difficulty, people with hemianopia have measurable difficulty viewing video and related tasks, and interventions like the content guide can provide benefit.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

The content guide dynamically directs attention to areas that were fixated by the majority of normally-sighted viewers. A) Kernel density estimate of the gaze points for this particular frame. B) Illustration of the content guide as it appeared for the same frame.

The content guide dynamically directs attention to areas that were fixated by the majority of normally-sighted viewers. A) Kernel density estimate of the gaze points for this particular frame. B) Illustration of the content guide as it appeared for the same frame.

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