June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Relationship between Silent Reading Performance and Clustered Visual Field in Patients with Glaucoma.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Noriaki Murata
    Department of Orthoptics and and Visual Sciences, Niigata University of Health and Welfare, Niigata-shi, Japan
    Division of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Graduated School of Medical and Dental Science, Niigata University, Niigata-shi, Niigata, Japan
  • Daiki Miyamoto
    Division of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Graduated School of Medical and Dental Science, Niigata University, Niigata-shi, Niigata, Japan
  • Tetsuya Togano
    Division of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Graduated School of Medical and Dental Science, Niigata University, Niigata-shi, Niigata, Japan
  • Takeo Fukuchi
    Division of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Graduated School of Medical and Dental Science, Niigata University, Niigata-shi, Niigata, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Noriaki Murata, None; Daiki Miyamoto, None; Tetsuya Togano, None; Takeo Fukuchi, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 2838. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Noriaki Murata, Daiki Miyamoto, Tetsuya Togano, Takeo Fukuchi; Relationship between Silent Reading Performance and Clustered Visual Field in Patients with Glaucoma.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):2838.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To investigate the relationship between silent reading parameters and clustered visual field (VF) in Patients with glaucoma.

Methods : Fifty glaucoma patients (mean age; 52.8±10.6 yr) were included in the study. VF testing was performed using the Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, CA, USA). HFA24-2 test points were divided 6 clusters and averaged visual sensitivity in each cluster. We also calculated integrated visual field (IVF), and sensitivities were further averaged in 3 clusters, respectively. Patients silently read Japanese articles while the Tobii TX300 eye tracker (Tobii Technology, Danderyd, Sweden) monitored and calculated reading duration per 100 characters (RD), number of fixations per 100 characters (NF), and mean fixation duration (mFD). Spearman correlation coefficient analysis was applied to assess the relationship between silent reading performance and clustered VF of the right (R) versus left (L) eye and the better (B) versus worse (W) eye and clustered IVF.

Results : Reading parameters of glaucoma patients were: RD, 9.5±3.4 sec; NF, 33.4±10.8 times; mFD, 232.8±25.6 msec. RD correlated significantly with the mean sensitivities of 24-2 R clusters 1-4, 24-2 W cluster 1 (rs=-0.307- -0.379, P<0.05). NF correlated significantly with the sensitivities of 24-2 R cluster 1 and 24-2 W cluster 1 (rs=-0.305, -0.347, P<0.05). There was no significant correlation between clustered IVF and RD or NF. For mFD, significant correlation were observed with 24-2 R clusters 1,3,4, 24-2 L clusters 2-4, 24-2 B clusters 1~4, 24-2 W clusters 3,4 (rs=-0.280- -0.438, P<0.05). Significant correlation was also identified between mFD and IVF clusters 1,3 (rs= -0.316, -0.344, P<0.05).

Conclusions : We found that VF in the higher sensitivity contributed to the reduction of reading performance in the analysis of the monocular VF. Furthermore, not only the central but also peripheral IVF correlated with increased mFD. Overall, mFD might be associated with partially glaucomatous VF defects even if visual acuity was preserved.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

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