June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Bionic Vision: Interaction between color luminance and on-screen shape recognition.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alex Gonzalez
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Kasey Zann
    Ophthalmology, VA Healthcare System, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Mariela C Aguilar
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Cornelis J. Rowaan
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Byron L Lam
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Ninel Gregori
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Ophthalmology, VA Healthcare System, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Jean-Marie A Parel
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Brien Holden Vision Institute and Vision Cooperative Research Centre, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Alex Gonzalez, None; Kasey Zann, None; Mariela Aguilar, None; Cornelis Rowaan, None; Byron Lam, None; Ninel Gregori, None; Jean-Marie Parel, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Florida Lions Eye Bank; Drs KR Olsen and ME Hildebrandt; Drs R Urs and A Furtado; NIH Center Grant P30EY14801; an unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness; VisionCRC, Brien Holden Vision Institute; Henri and Flore Lesieur Foundation (JMP). This research work was solely supported by OBC and would not have been possible without the efforts & feedback of Carmen Torres and Otto Catalan.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 4234. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Alex Gonzalez, Kasey Zann, Mariela C Aguilar, Cornelis J. Rowaan, Byron L Lam, Ninel Gregori, Jean-Marie A Parel; Bionic Vision: Interaction between color luminance and on-screen shape recognition.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):4234.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Luminance is a measure that describes the perceived brightness of a color, in this study we investigate the interaction between the color luminance of on-screen shapes and recognition accuracy as part of a home- based, rehabilitation program designed to help patients with bionic vision.

Methods : Home-based computer rehabilitation modules were programmed using National Instruments Labview Development Suite (Austin, TX.). The patient is emailed a web link allowing the download and installation of the module. Module instructions are administered via computer synthesized voice, and subject is shown a random solid filled shape (circle, square triangle), colored (red, green, blue, white, gray, pink, purple, brown, orange, yellow) and centered on the screen. Each session has eight items, and there is no time limit during the viewing phase. The subject presses the spacebar to enter the recognition phase and selects the shape by keyboard number press (1, 2 or 3). At the completion of each module data measuring accuracy and timing are programmatically transmitted back for analysis via secure email. Two subjects, one implanted with the Argus II retinal prosthesis for 12 months, the other for 24 months, completed 58 sessions, recognizing 465 shapes.

Results : Recognition accuracy was greater (82.6% ± 1.9) with low luminance colored shapes (brown, red, purple, and blue), compared to high luminance colors (gray, green, yellow, white) (76.0 ± 5.5), this difference trended toward statistical significance (p=0.09).

Conclusions : Artificial vision devices provide ultra-low vision, allowing for crude perception of objects. High luminance colored objects may be more challenging to identify due to haloing of the contours, a consequence of limited brightness levels and low density of electrodes in the implanted array.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

 

This chart shows that blue has the lowest luminance value compared to yellow, which is only six percentage steps away from white.

This chart shows that blue has the lowest luminance value compared to yellow, which is only six percentage steps away from white.

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