June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Nonlinear Mixed Effects Modeling of Electroretinography (ERG) b-wave Latency for Whole Eye Transplantation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard Anthony Bilonick
    Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
    Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Valeria L. N. Fu
    Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
    Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Lin He
    Plastic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
    Plastic, Aesthetic and Craniofacial Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, China
  • Chiaki Komatsu
    Plastic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Maxine R. Miller
    Plastic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Ian Rosner
    Plastic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Wendy Chen
    Plastic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Jila Noorikolouri
    Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
    Plastic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Kia M. Washington
    Plastic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
    Veterans Administration Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Richard Bilonick, None; Valeria Fu, None; Lin He, None; Chiaki Komatsu, None; Maxine Miller, None; Ian Rosner, None; Wendy Chen, None; Jila Noorikolouri, None; Kia Washington, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs under Award No. W81XWH- 14-1-0421, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare Administration, ; Eye and Ear Foundation (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania); and Research to Prevent Blindness (New York, New York)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 5871. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Richard Anthony Bilonick, Valeria L. N. Fu, Lin He, Chiaki Komatsu, Maxine R. Miller, Ian Rosner, Wendy Chen, Jila Noorikolouri, Kia M. Washington; Nonlinear Mixed Effects Modeling of Electroretinography (ERG) b-wave Latency for Whole Eye Transplantation. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):5871.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose :
The goal was to estimate the difference in ERG b-wave latency for transplanted eyes vs the fellow/naive eye.

Methods :
6 rats were studied. Right eyes were transplanted. At 12 week timepoint, rats were dark-adapted in a dark box overnight. Animals were anaesthetized and were prepared for ERG recording in a light-sealed room. Recording electrodes gently contacted the corneal surface of eyes. A subdermal needle electrode served as common reference while another subdermal needle electrode was inserted at the base of the left leg. A Ganzfield delivered light stimuli with various stimulus strengths following different programmed dark adaption and light adaption protocols. Log b-wave latency responses were sigmoidal, so a nononlinear mixed effects model was used. R environment for statistical computing was used. 4 parameter logistic function was used to fit the b-wave log latency as a function of log light intensity with parameters: 1) A – asymptote as light intensity goes to -infinity, 2) B - asymptote as light intensity goes to +infinity, 3) Xmid – inflection point for light intensity, and 4) S – scale = difference between Xmid and light intensity where response is 75% of distance from A to B asymptotes. Larger S = shallower slope. Fixed effects were A, B, Xmid, and S for the left/naive eye and their differences with right eyes. Random effects (RE) were included for rats for Xmidrat) and for eyes for B (σeye). Fixed effects (FE) describe typical effect while REs describe rat/eye-specific effects.

Results :
There were no consistent detectable OD ERG responses for rat 1. Model results shown in Table 1. Left half of table shows FE estimates in log space. Where possible, FE values were converted to original scale and shown on right half of table. Bottom part of table shows RE estimates and residual standard error. Compared to left/naive eyes, sigmoidal curve for transplanted right eyes had 1) similar asymptote A, 2) lower asymptote B, 3) higher inflection point Xmid, and 4) lower scale S. Difference in inflection points was statistically significant (0.0810, P<0.0001). FE + RE are shown in Figure 1.

Conclusions :
The b-wave latency showed clear sigmoidal patterns for transplanted and left eyes. For transplanted/right eyes, however, the decrease in latency occured later and bottomed out at a lower level than for the naive/left eye. Rate of decrease was greater for the transplanted/right eyes.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

 

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×