June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Optical Coherence Tomography Angiographic Findings in Patients with Posterior Uveitis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ching Jygh Chen
    Department of Ophthalmology, Univ of Mississippi Med Center, Jackson, Mississippi, United States
  • Jordan Burnham
    Department of Ophthalmology, Univ of Mississippi Med Center, Jackson, Mississippi, United States
  • Matthew Olson
    Department of Ophthalmology, Univ of Mississippi Med Center, Jackson, Mississippi, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Ching Chen, Allergan (R), Clinico (R), Optovue (C); Jordan Burnham, None; Matthew Olson, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 1684. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Ching Jygh Chen, Jordan Burnham, Matthew Olson; Optical Coherence Tomography Angiographic Findings in Patients with Posterior Uveitis. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):1684.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography (OCTA) is the new frontier of ocular imaging. We wish to report the OCTA findings in patients with posterior uveitis.

Methods : This is a retrospective case series study on 19 patients with posterior uveitis of various etiologies. There are 2 acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (AMPPE), 2 birdshot choroidopathy (BC), 1 cat scratch fever (CSF), 1 Rocky mountain spotted fever (RMSF), 5 ocular histoplasmosis (OHS), 1 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 1 toxocariasis, 2 multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS), 1 intermediate uveitis (IU), and 3 focal choroiditis of undetermined etiology (FCUE). We reviewed the Split Spectrum Amplitude Decorrelation Angiography (SSADA) based OCTA images along with fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of 31 involved eyes to detect the findings of each disease.

Results : The OCTA findings of posterior uveitis varied depending on the nature and location of the diseases. Findings include 1) Multiple patches of focal choriocapillary non-perfusion surrounded by choricapillary dilatation in choriocapillary slab in AMPPE, 2) Vascular looping, remodeling, focal dilatation and capillary drop out in both superficial and deep retinal slabs in BC, 3) Focal dilatation of capillaries and retinal arterial blockage in superficial retinal slab with patchy blockage of outer retinal and choriocapillary slabs in CSF. 4) Multiple patchy blockage corresponding to cotton wool spots in all four tissue slabs in RMSF, 5) Choroidal neovascular membrane in choriocapillary slab in OHS, 6) Branch arterial and venous occlusion in superficial retinal slab in SLE, 7) Significant vascular distortion and dragging in superficial retina slab in toxocariasis, 8) Focal capillary dilatation in superficial and deep retinal slabs, and multiple small hyporeflective spots in choriocapillary slab in MEWDS, 9) Patchy image blockage of all four tissue slabs in IU, and 10) Focal capillary dilatation and increased flow in FCUE.

Conclusions : SSADA based OCTA can offer significant additional information then FA and OCT. It can also provide the blood flow information in each of the four segmented tissue slabs to help the researchers understand the pathophysiology of the posterior uveitis better.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

Vascular looping, remodeling, focal dilatation and capillary drop out in both superficial and deep retinal slabs in birdshot choroidopathy

Vascular looping, remodeling, focal dilatation and capillary drop out in both superficial and deep retinal slabs in birdshot choroidopathy

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×