June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Yellow nighttime driving glasses reduce pedestrian detection performance with headlight glare
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Merve Tuccar-Burak
    Schepens Eye Research Institute, MEEI, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Alex Hwang
    Schepens Eye Research Institute, MEEI, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Eli Peli
    Schepens Eye Research Institute, MEEI, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Merve Tuccar-Burak, None; Alex Hwang, None; Eli Peli, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant 5R01 EY024075-03
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 4302. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Merve Tuccar-Burak, Alex Hwang, Eli Peli; Yellow nighttime driving glasses reduce pedestrian detection performance with headlight glare. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):4302.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Higher fatalities at nighttime mostly affect pedestrians. Oncoming headlight glare (HLG) is annoying many drivers and is presumed to reduce the visibility of pedestrians. Glasses with yellow lenses are advertised to help drivers see better at night, and reduce the impact of HLG. We measured the impact of three such glasses on the response time for detecting a pedestrian with and without simulated HLG in a driving simulator.

Methods : Three nighttime glasses, Night-Lite (Eagle Eyes Optics, Van Nuys, CA), HD Night Vision (IdeaVillage Co., Wayne, NJ), and Knight Visor (Blupond Inc., Netanya, Israel) were tested. Four normally sighted (NV) subjects (n=4) drove a nighttime scenario 8 times (with/without HLG simulation X with/without nighttime glasses). Each 10-minute driving session included 30 pedestrian encounters. The pedestrian either walked along or cross the road while an oncoming car is passing by. Six null-pedestrian events were included (where no pedestrian showed up when an oncoming car was approaching). Driving order for the HLG and glasses conditions was counterbalanced. Subjects were instructed to press the horn as soon as they detected a pedestrian while driving the scenario. Reaction time (between pedestrian appearance and honk) was measured. A two-way ANOVA was computed for within-subject analysis for each glass condition.

Results : Without HLG presence,there was minimal effect on response time with the glasses. With HLG presence, the response time increased in both with and without the glasses conditions. The detrimental effect of HLG was much larger with the yellow glasses. No significant main effects of HLG types (all ps>0.13) and glasses types (all ps>0.14) were found. However, significant interactions were found for Night-Lite (F(1,3)=12.82, p=0.037) and HD Night Vision (F(1,3)=15.32, p=0.03). Although the interaction for the Knight Visor was not significant (F(1,3)=4.8, p=0.12), the data showed the same trend of performance degradation with the presence of HLG.

Conclusions : Yellow nighttime driving glasses did not improve pedestrian detection performance without HLG. However, with HLG, those glasses degraded performance more with than without glasses.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

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