June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Image Quality Comparison Between Non-Mydriatic and Mydriatic High-resolution True-Color Widefield Fundus Images
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jochen Straub
    R&D, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, California, United States
  • Conor Leahy
    R&D, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, California, United States
  • Jennifer Luu
    R&D, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, California, United States
  • Jeff Schmidt
    R&D, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, California, United States
  • Mary K Durbin
    R&D, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jochen Straub, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc (E); Conor Leahy, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc (E); Jennifer Luu, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc (E); Jeff Schmidt, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc (E); Mary Durbin, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc (E)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 5454. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Jochen Straub, Conor Leahy, Jennifer Luu, Jeff Schmidt, Mary K Durbin; Image Quality Comparison Between Non-Mydriatic and Mydriatic High-resolution True-Color Widefield Fundus Images. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):5454.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To compare the color, resolution, contrast, and field of view of high-resolution true-color widefield fundus images, captured using a prototype widefield slit-scanning ophthalmoscope (ZEISS, Dublin, CA), imaging the same eyes undilated (non-mydriatic) and after dilation (mydriatic).

Methods : We captured high-resolution true-color widefield fundus images of the same eyes before and after dilation. We first imaged the eyes with a naturally dark-adapted pupil. After dilating the eyes using cycloplegic eye drops, we imaged the same eyes again. Pupil diameter (PD) was measured and recorded prior to each acquisition using a PD ruler. Images were visually compared by a clinical expert with respect to color, resolution, contrast, and field of view.

Results : We captured images on 6 eyes of 6 normal healthy subjects. The sample included eyes with natural lens (phakic) and artificial lens (pseudophakic). We were able to capture images of all eyes. Visual comparison of the images with undilated and dilated pupils showed no significant difference in color or resolution. Resolution was evaluated in the central retinal field of view and in the periphery. The achieved field of view was identical. The images captured with dilated pupils had slightly higher contrast than the images of the same eyes captured with undilated pupils. Figure 1 shows an example of an undilated eye. Figure 2 shows an image captured of the same eye after dilation.

Conclusions : All images taken before and after dilation were found to be clinically useful. No significant differences in color, resolution, or field of view were found when comparing non-mydriatic and mydriatic images captured with the widefield slit-scanning opthalmoscope prototype. Images of eyes with dilated pupils have slightly higher contrast. The prototype provides clinically useful true-color high-resolution widefield fundus images when imaging undilated or dilated eyes.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

Fig. 1: Widefield fundus image (healthy 45 year old male; undilated; PD 3mm)

Fig. 1: Widefield fundus image (healthy 45 year old male; undilated; PD 3mm)

 

Figure 2: Widefield fundus image of the same subject (mydriatic; PD 7mm).

Figure 2: Widefield fundus image of the same subject (mydriatic; PD 7mm).

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