June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Short-term safety of intracameral moxifloxacin after cataract surgery.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nelise De paiva Lucena
    Retina, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil
  • kaline sandrelli amorim ferreira
    Retina, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil
  • Maria Isabel Lynch
    Retina, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil
  • Rodrigo Pessoa Cavalcanti Lira
    Retina, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Nelise Lucena, None; kaline ferreira, None; Maria Isabel Lynch, None; Rodrigo Lira, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 5502. doi:
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      Nelise De paiva Lucena, kaline sandrelli amorim ferreira, Maria Isabel Lynch, Rodrigo Pessoa Cavalcanti Lira; Short-term safety of intracameral moxifloxacin after cataract surgery.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):5502.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Intracameral moxifloxacin (MFLX) have been used worldwide as an off-label option for prevention of post cataract endophthalmitis. There are some concerns related to safety. The purpose of this research to study the 5-weeks safety of MFLX after cataract surgery.

Methods : It was included a consecutive sample of 1000 cataract surgeries at our hospital between 2013 and 2016 (1000 eyes of 1000 patients). The inclusion criteria were patients with indication of cataract surgery, ≥ 55 years old, and without history of allergy to quinolones. It was excluded patients with any other ocular disease than cataract. Patients were prepared for surgery using povidone 5% solution diluted as a topical antiseptic agent. The operative technique was phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation. A 0.3 mL syringe was partially filled MFLX. The patients received 150-μg/0.03 mL of MFLX through the surgical incision, at the end of the surgery. Postoperatively, patients were prescribed: (1) MFLX 0.5% eyedrops 5 times daily for 1 week, and (2) prednisolone acetate 1% eyedrops 5 times daily for 1 week, followed by 4 times daily for 1 week and subsequently 2 times daily for 3 weeks. The primary outcome was incidence of acute endophthalmitis. Patients presenting with pain, hypopyon, a cloudy anterior chamber, vitritis, or loss of vision attributed to infection were given a diagnosis of presumed bacterial endophthalmitis. The secondary outcomes were mean change from baseline to 5-weeks in corneal endothelial cell density (CC), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA – Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letter score) and intraocular pressure (IOP). Between-group differences for two groups continuous variables were compared using the paired t-test. The P value was 2-tailed to IOP, and were 1-tailed for visual acuity and IOP. Statistical significance was set at the 0.05 level.

Results : The mean age was 67 SD 5 years. 56.4% were female. From baseline to 5 weeks, there were no significant differences among the groups regarding mean change in CC, CDVA, and IOP (Table). No ocular or systemic adverse events were observed.

Conclusions : The results suggest MFLX is a safe option for intracameral use after cataract surgery.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

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