June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Age- and accommodation- dependence of the human crystalline lens shape and thickness measured with extended-depth Optical Coherence Tomography
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alex Thanhlong Pham
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Ethan Adre
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Keke Liu
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Yu-Cherng Chang
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Ivan Shestopalov
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Florence Cabot
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Anne Bates Leach Eye Hospital, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Siobhan Williams
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Giovanni Gregori
    Quantitative Imaging Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Marco Ruggeri
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Arthur Ho
    Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Jean-Marie A Parel
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Fabrice Manns
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Alex Pham, None; Ethan Adre, None; Keke Liu, None; Yu-Cherng Chang, None; Ivan Shestopalov, None; Florence Cabot, None; Siobhan Williams, None; Giovanni Gregori, None; Marco Ruggeri, US Patent 8,425,037 (P); Arthur Ho, None; Jean-Marie Parel, US Patent 8,425,037 (P); Fabrice Manns, US Patent 8,425,037 (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support  National Eye Institute Grants 2R01EY14225, P30EY14801 (Center Grant); Florida Lions Eye Bank; Drs KR Olsen and ME Hildebrandt; Drs R Urs and A Furtado; the Henri and Flore Lesieur Foundation (JMP); an unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness; and the Australian Federal Government Cooperative Research Centre Scheme through the Vision Cooperative Research Centre.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 1244. doi:
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      Alex Thanhlong Pham, Ethan Adre, Keke Liu, Yu-Cherng Chang, Ivan Shestopalov, Florence Cabot, Siobhan Williams, Giovanni Gregori, Marco Ruggeri, Arthur Ho, Jean-Marie A Parel, Fabrice Manns; Age- and accommodation- dependence of the human crystalline lens shape and thickness measured with extended-depth Optical Coherence Tomography. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):1244.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To quantify the changes in anterior and posterior lens curvature and thickness with accommodation and with age using extended-depth Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT).

Methods : Under an IRB protocol, 15 eyes from 10 subjects (Age range: 21 to 60 years) were imaged with an accommodation biometry system that combines a fixation target with adjustable vergence and a custom-built extended-depth OCT system that enables imaging of the anterior segment from the anterior corneal surface to the posterior lens (840 nm, 12,500 A-lines/s, 8 μm axial resolution) (Ruggeri et al, Biomed Opt Exp 2012). For each subject, OCT images (400 A-lines) were acquired with the fixation target adjusted to vergences ranging from 0 D (distance) to 6 D (near) in 1 D increments. Images acquired at each stimulus were processed using a program written in MATLAB to automatically segment the corneal and lens boundaries and correct for refractive distortions. Distortion correction for the posterior surface of the lens assumed a uniform refractive index (n=1.415) for the crystalline lens. For each subject, the change in anterior and posterior lens radius of curvature and lens thickness change with accommodation stimulus was estimated using linear regression to produce shape- and thickness-stimulus slopes (in mm/D). Change in the lens curvature and shape was assessed as a function of age.

Results : Anterior and posterior lens curvatures steepened and lens thickness increased with accommodation, consistent with the Helmholtz theory of accommodation (Figure 1). The accommodative change in shape (in mm/D) decreased with age (Figure 2), unlike results obtained using Scheimpflug imaging (Dubbelman et al, Vis Res 2005).

Conclusions : OCT biometry enables characterization of the age-dependence of the accommodative response of the crystalline lens.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

Figure 1: Typical accommodative response showing the change in anterior lens curvature, posterior lens curvature, and lens thickness versus accommodation in response to step stimuli of with amplitude ranging from 1D to 6D. Data is from a 26 year old subject.

Figure 1: Typical accommodative response showing the change in anterior lens curvature, posterior lens curvature, and lens thickness versus accommodation in response to step stimuli of with amplitude ranging from 1D to 6D. Data is from a 26 year old subject.

 

Figure 2: Age-dependence of the slopes of anterior radius (left), posterior radius (center) and lens thickness (right) versus accommodation stimulus.

Figure 2: Age-dependence of the slopes of anterior radius (left), posterior radius (center) and lens thickness (right) versus accommodation stimulus.

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