June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Comparison of adult versus pediatric ophthalmology consults at a tertiary Level 1 trauma medical center
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jonathan Jacobs
    Ophthalmology, Westchester Medical Center, Yonkers, New York, United States
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, United States
  • Brett Bielory
    Ophthalmology, Westchester Medical Center, Yonkers, New York, United States
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, United States
  • Thaddeus Wandel
    Ophthalmology, Westchester Medical Center, Yonkers, New York, United States
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, United States
  • Kenneth Juechter
    Ophthalmology, Westchester Medical Center, Yonkers, New York, United States
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jonathan Jacobs, None; Brett Bielory, None; Thaddeus Wandel, None; Kenneth Juechter, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 2434. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Jonathan Jacobs, Brett Bielory, Thaddeus Wandel, Kenneth Juechter; Comparison of adult versus pediatric ophthalmology consults at a tertiary Level 1 trauma medical center. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):2434.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : To describe a large academic medical center’s use of an inpatient ophthalmology service and determine the most common diagnoses in both the pediatric and adult populations. The goals of this study are to compare the reasons for consult and the primary ophthalmic diagnoses among the pediatric and adult consultation service at a single institution.

Methods : A retrospective chart review of all inpatient ophthalmology consults from July 2014 to June 2015 was conducted. Patient age, gender, consulting service, time of exam, exam type (slit lamp/bedside), primary medical diagnosis, reason for consult, primary ophthalmic diagnosis, and ophthalmic interventions were recorded. Data were analyzed using a two-sample t-test with significance determined at p < 0.05.

Results : 863 consults were reviewed. The most common reasons for consultation the adult population was eye pain (15.7%, P<0.01) while the pediatric population showed a statistically significant difference in consultation request from the adult population. The most common primary medical ophthalmic diagnosis among adults were: normal exam, orbital fracture, and corneal abrasion respectively. A higher rate of normal exams was observed between pediatric consultations (58.7%) versus adult consultations (29.6%). See Table 1.

Conclusions : Academic medical centers like Westchester Medical Center have a highly diverse patient population. Our results show the characteristics of consultations from various services in the hospital, the reasons those consults were called, and the final diagnoses of the ophthalmic consultation. These data can be used by ophthalmic physicians and house officers to improve their own skills, and to teach non-ophthalmologists about the management of common ophthalmic diagnoses.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

Comparison of adult and pediatric primary ophthalmic diagnoses and reasons for consult.

Comparison of adult and pediatric primary ophthalmic diagnoses and reasons for consult.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×