June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Partial Field Holoscopy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tilman Schmoll
    Research and Development, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, California, United States
  • Daniel Bublitz
    Corporate Research & Development, ZEISS AG, Jena, Germany
  • Nathan D Shemonski
    Research and Development, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, California, United States
  • Lars Omlor
    Corporate Research & Development, ZEISS AG, Oberkochen, Germany
  • Christoph Nieten
    Corporate Research & Development, ZEISS AG, Jena, Germany
  • Matthew J Everett
    Research and Development, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Tilman Schmoll, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc. (E); Daniel Bublitz, ZEISS AG (E); Nathan Shemonski, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc. (E); Lars Omlor, ZEISS AG (E); Christoph Nieten, ZEISS AG (E); Matthew Everett, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc. (E)
  • Footnotes
    Support  German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Photonik Forschung Deutschland, 13GW0043A
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 3810. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Tilman Schmoll, Daniel Bublitz, Nathan D Shemonski, Lars Omlor, Christoph Nieten, Matthew J Everett; Partial Field Holoscopy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):3810.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To improve the resolution and collection efficiency of optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. Today’s ophthalmic OCT systems detect only about 5% of the light exiting the pupil because they use only about 20% of the eye’s numerical aperture (NA). To overcome this, we introduce partial field holoscopy, which creates images of the human retina with high detection efficiency and high spatially in-variant resolution.

Methods : We built an in-vivo swept source partial field holoscopy system, which illuminates the retina with a low NA beam and collects the backscattered light with a high NA using a spatially resolved detection unit. It consists of 2 detectors, arranged in a balanced detection configuration, each containing 37 detection channels. In conjunction with the 10 kHz, 1060 nm swept source this results in an effective A-scan rate of 370 kHz. For computationally correcting defocus and aberrations of the eye, we require phase sensitive, angle diverse data. Access to the phase is enabled by the interferometric nature of the imaging method and angle diverse information is provided by the spatially resolved detection unit. For reconstructing volumes with spatially invariant resolution, we use the subaperture correlation based digital adaptive optics algorithm (A. Kumar et al. Opt. Express 2013).

Results : Images of reflective as well as highly scattering test targets were acquired. A significant resolution improvement was observed after defocus correction, even in heavily scattering samples (Fig. 1). In Fig. 2 a first in-vivo retina scan can be seen. Fig. 2e demonstrates speckle reduction by incoherently adding the 37 detection channels.

Conclusions : Partial field holoscopy enables a detection efficiency and resolution otherwise only achievable with hardware adaptive optics. The angle diverse and phase sensitive nature of the captured data will enable many exiting extensions, e.g. photoreceptor imaging, quantitative blood flow measurements, tissue specific directional scattering contrast, dark field imaging.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

Fig. 1 a) group 6 elements 2&3 of USAF resolution test target, showing the resolution improvement after digital correction; b) USAF target with scotch tape on top, to demonstrate computational refocusing of highly scattering samples

Fig. 1 a) group 6 elements 2&3 of USAF resolution test target, showing the resolution improvement after digital correction; b) USAF target with scotch tape on top, to demonstrate computational refocusing of highly scattering samples

 

Fig. 2 a) In-vivo prototype; b) fiber array used as detector; c) average b-scan of 37 detection channels; d) center channel b-scan of section indicated by red box; e) average of all 37 channels, showing significant speckle reduction

Fig. 2 a) In-vivo prototype; b) fiber array used as detector; c) average b-scan of 37 detection channels; d) center channel b-scan of section indicated by red box; e) average of all 37 channels, showing significant speckle reduction

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