June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Regrowth of Meibomian Gland Tissue After Intraductal Meibomian Gland Probing in Patients With
Obstructive Meibomian Gland Dysfunction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Steven L Maskin
    Dry Eye and Cornea Treatment Center, Tampa, Florida, United States
  • Whitney R Testa
    Dry Eye and Cornea Treatment Center, Tampa, Florida, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Steven Maskin, Rhein (P); Whitney Testa, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 4392. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Steven L Maskin, Whitney R Testa; Regrowth of Meibomian Gland Tissue After Intraductal Meibomian Gland Probing in Patients With
      Obstructive Meibomian Gland Dysfunction. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):4392.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To report statistically significant growth of Meibomian Gland (MG) tissue after Meibomian Gland Probing (MGP) from patients with obstructive Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (o-MGD).

Methods : Retrospective study comparing pre and post MGP non-contact infrared (IR) meibography results in patients with o-MGD, looking at signs of individual MG growth and increase in overall MG tissue area within total measurement field (TMF).

Results : Post MGP meibography of 34 upper lids of 19 patients (4.5-12 month follow up) showed 14 lids (41.2%) with signs of individual gland growth. 3 lids had light artifact or lid distortion limiting quantitative analysis, 1 lid developed a hordeolum. 10 remaining lids showed a significant collective increase in mean individual glandular area within TMF of 4.87% (p=0.0145). 4 of 10 lids showed significant increase in MG tissue area from 10.70% to 21.13% (p< 0.0001, p=0.0277, p=0.0292, and p=0.0345). At >12 to <25 months follow-up, 16 upper lids of 9 additional patients showed 4 lids (25%) with signs of individual gland growth. 1 lid had distortion, limiting quantitative analysis. 3 remaining lids showed significant collective increase in mean individual glandular area within TMF of 11.19% (p=0.0004). 2 of 3 lids showed significant increase in MG tissue area of 13.73% and 20.00% (p= 0.0097 and p=0.0001). For all 13 analyzed lids with a follow-up of <25 months, there was a significant increase of 6.23% in overall total glandular area from 34.93% to 37.16% of TMF (p=0.0447). Findings included lengthening of shortened MGs, increased density and definition of faded atrophic appearing MGs, growth of discontinuous segments into continuous MG, and appearance of a new MG.

Conclusions : MGP was associated with increased MG tissue area and regrowth of atrophied MGs as viewed on meibography. MGP may promote MG regrowth in part by mechanically and directly establishing a patent duct/orifice system as well as provide unequivocal physical proof of a patent meibum outflow tract through the natural orifice.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

Rectangles highlight atrophic area in the TMF with growth and regeneration. A. Pre/post MGP image from IR meibography. B. Pre/post MGP image after desaturation and inversion of color image. C. Pre/post MGP traces of TMF and individual MGs. Pre MGP images show proximal atrophy with shortened gland length. Post MGP shows an increased lengthening of these glands.

Rectangles highlight atrophic area in the TMF with growth and regeneration. A. Pre/post MGP image from IR meibography. B. Pre/post MGP image after desaturation and inversion of color image. C. Pre/post MGP traces of TMF and individual MGs. Pre MGP images show proximal atrophy with shortened gland length. Post MGP shows an increased lengthening of these glands.

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