June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Retinal vascular biometry in wild-type and a retinal vascular leakage model in Zebrafish using OCT angiography
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ivan Bozic
    Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Kathleen Spitz
    Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Lana M Pollock
    Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Bela Anand-Apte
    Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Yuankai Tao
    Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Ivan Bozic, None; Kathleen Spitz, None; Lana Pollock, None; Bela Anand-Apte, None; Yuankai Tao, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 4872. doi:
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      Ivan Bozic, Kathleen Spitz, Lana M Pollock, Bela Anand-Apte, Yuankai Tao; Retinal vascular biometry in wild-type and a retinal vascular leakage model in Zebrafish using OCT angiography. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):4872.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : In vivo assays enable longitudinal imaging of pathogenesis and response to novel therapeutics. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography (OCT-A) allow for noninvasive visualization of structural and functional changes in the retina, respectively. We propose novel biometric algorithms to quantify changes in retinal vasculature to quantify longitudinal changes in a zebrafish model of retinal vascular leakage.

Methods : In vivo zebrafish retinal datasets were imaged using a custom-built spectral domain OCT system (855±45 nm and 125 kHz line-rate) under an IRB-approved protocol (Fig. 1(a)). OCT-A volumes were acquired with a 5 repeated B-scans at each position and vascular maps were calculated using wOMAG in post-processing (Fig. 1(b), (c)). Animals were anesthetized using a 0.14% Tricaine solution and imaged air. A subset of study animals was treated with 10 µM diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB) and 0.04% dimethyl sulfoxide in 1 L of water for 26 h to induce vascular leakage. Wild-type (WT, nWT=10) and vascular leakage model (nDEAB=10) zebrafish were imaged longitudinally in both eyes at multiple time-points: tWT=10 and tDEAB=6 (pre-treatment and 1, 3, 6, 8, 10 days post-treatment). Custom-developed segmentation algorithms were used to extract biometric features from OCT-A vessel maps including vessel segment length, curvature, and branch angle (Fig. 1(d)).

Results : OCT-A vascular maps showed distinct biometric features that may be used to uniquely identify each animal. WT animals showed no significant changes in vascular biometry during longitudinal time-points (Fig. 1(e)-(g)). We observed retinal vascular occlusion followed by reperfusion in DEAB treated animals (Fig. 1(h)-(m)).

Conclusions : OCT-A enabled noninvasive visualization of retinal vascular occlusion and reperfusion. These preliminary results motivate potential applications of OCT-A as a tool for studying pathogenesis and therapeutic screening in zebrafish models of vascular disease.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

In vivo OCT of zebrafish retina. (a) SD-OCT was used to image retinal (b) structure and (c) vasculature. (d) Branch vessel segmentation overlaid onto OCT-A map. Biometric features including (e) vessel segment length, (f) curvature, and (g) branch angle in WT animals. Longitudinal imaging in DEAB treated animal (h) before treatment and (i) 1, (j) 3, (k) 6 and (l) 8 days after treatment. (m)-(o) Biometric changes relative to baseline.

In vivo OCT of zebrafish retina. (a) SD-OCT was used to image retinal (b) structure and (c) vasculature. (d) Branch vessel segmentation overlaid onto OCT-A map. Biometric features including (e) vessel segment length, (f) curvature, and (g) branch angle in WT animals. Longitudinal imaging in DEAB treated animal (h) before treatment and (i) 1, (j) 3, (k) 6 and (l) 8 days after treatment. (m)-(o) Biometric changes relative to baseline.

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