June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Dietary Nutrients and Age-Related Cataract in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study: A Study of Prevalence, Incidence, and Progression to Cataract Extraction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lauren Doss
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, United States
  • Tanya Glaser
    National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Elvira Agron
    National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Traci E Clemons
    National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • JohnPaul SanGiovanni
    National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Emily Chew
    National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Lauren Doss, None; Tanya Glaser, None; Elvira Agron, None; Traci Clemons, None; JohnPaul SanGiovanni, None; Emily Chew, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 5723. doi:
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      Lauren Doss, Tanya Glaser, Elvira Agron, Traci E Clemons, JohnPaul SanGiovanni, Emily Chew; Dietary Nutrients and Age-Related Cataract in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study: A Study of Prevalence, Incidence, and Progression to Cataract Extraction. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):5723.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To evaluate relationships of dietary nutrient intake with baseline status and incidence of age-related cataract in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS).

Methods : In this nested case-control and prospective study from a multi-center phase 3 randomized clinical trial, we estimated baseline nutrient intake with a validated food frequency questionnaire and ascertained cataract presence, severity, and progression from annual photographs across a 12 year (y) period. We applied repeated measures logistic regression to examine the baseline nutrient-cataract relationships, and Cox regression in the incident analysis. Analysis of cataract prevalence included 6129 eyes of 3115 participants collected over 10.4 years. Analyses of cataract incidence included 6046 eyes of 3073 participants over a 10.5 year period.

Results : Intake of vitamin A (see Table 1 and 2 for Odds Ratios), copper, zinc, magnesium, calcium, and lactose was associated with decreased baseline prevalence of at least moderate nuclear cataract. Cholesterol, linoleic acid, monounsaturated fat, and oleic acid were associated with increased incidence of nuclear cataract. Vitamin E and Niacin were associated with decreased incidence of nuclear cataract. Arachidonic acid was associated with an increase in progression to cataract extraction.

Conclusions : Dietary intake of certain nutrients may be associated with cataract incidence and prevalence. Specifically, vitamin A, copper, magnesium, calcium and lactose were associated with a decreased baseline prevalence of mild and moderate nuclear cataract, while various fatty acids conferred significant risk for prevalence or incidence of nuclear cataract.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

Table 1. Heat map depicting hazard ratios for nutrients and the prevalence of nuclear and cortical cataracts by comparing highest vs. lowest energy adjusted intake quintiles

Table 1. Heat map depicting hazard ratios for nutrients and the prevalence of nuclear and cortical cataracts by comparing highest vs. lowest energy adjusted intake quintiles

 

Table 2. Heat map depicting hazard ratios for nutrients and the progression of nuclear, cortical, and PSC cataracts by comparing highest vs. lowest energy adjusted intake quintiles

Table 2. Heat map depicting hazard ratios for nutrients and the progression of nuclear, cortical, and PSC cataracts by comparing highest vs. lowest energy adjusted intake quintiles

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