June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Normal Range of Eye Movement and Its Relationship to Age
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Han Woong Lim
    Ophthalmology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Yumi Song
    Ophthalmology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Ji Hong Kim
    Ophthalmology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Yong Un Shin
    Ophthalmology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Sun Jin Hwang
    Ophthalmology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Sukwoo Hong
    Ophthalmology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Han Woong Lim, None; Yumi Song, None; Ji Hong Kim, None; Yong Un Shin, None; Sun Jin Hwang, None; Sukwoo Hong, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Korea Research Foundation
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 747. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Han Woong Lim, Yumi Song, Ji Hong Kim, Yong Un Shin, Sun Jin Hwang, Sukwoo Hong; Normal Range of Eye Movement and Its Relationship to Age. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):747.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : To determinethe range of eye movement in normal human subjects and to investigate the effect of age on eye movement.

Methods : A prospective observational study. We enrolled 261 healthy subjects, 5 to 91 years of age. Photographs were obtained in the cardinal gaze positions and processed using Photoshop. The processed images were analyzed using the Image J program to measure the angle of eye movement.The angle of eye movement was quantified using a modified limbus test.

Results : The normal ranges of eye movement were 44.9±7.2° in adduction, 44.2±6.8° in adduction, 27.9±7.6° in elevation, and 47.1±8.0° in depression. There were significant negative correlations between the angles of horizontal and upward gazes and age (R=-0.294 in adduction, R=-0.355 in abduction, and R=-0.506 in elevation, all P<0.001). However, the angle of downward gaze was not significantly correlated with age (R=0.017, P=0.722).

Conclusions : The normal ranges for the angle of horizontal gaze were symmetric, whereas therange of upward gaze angle was smaller than that for the downward gaze among all ages. Unlike the age-related decline of range in other gazes, only downward gaze was not impaired by increasing age. Differencesineye-movement range based ongaze direction and their associated aging mechanisms should be considered when assessing eye movements.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

 

Composite photographs were obtained in the 5 cardinal positions of gaze. The subject visually tracked the fixation target by shifting into maximum upward, downward, left, and right gazes.(A) Semitransparent image was overlapped with the primary position image.(B) The overlapping image was converted to identify the margin of the limbus.(C)

Composite photographs were obtained in the 5 cardinal positions of gaze. The subject visually tracked the fixation target by shifting into maximum upward, downward, left, and right gazes.(A) Semitransparent image was overlapped with the primary position image.(B) The overlapping image was converted to identify the margin of the limbus.(C)

 

Graph showing the age-dependent changes in eye movements for each direction. The ranges forthe horizontal gazes (adduction and abduction) decreased with advancing age, and the ranges for upward gaze decreased more rapidly than those for the horizontal gaze. On the other hand, there was no associationbetween the range of downward gaze and age.

Graph showing the age-dependent changes in eye movements for each direction. The ranges forthe horizontal gazes (adduction and abduction) decreased with advancing age, and the ranges for upward gaze decreased more rapidly than those for the horizontal gaze. On the other hand, there was no associationbetween the range of downward gaze and age.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×