June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Long-Term Follow-Up of Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy Treated with Intravitreal Bevacizumab
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maxwell Wagner
    Eastern Virginia Medical School, Virginia Beach, Virginia, United States
  • Nathaniel Tracer
    Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Edmund Tsui
    Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Jesse T McCann
    Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Irene A Barbazetto
    Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Maxwell Wagner, None; Nathaniel Tracer, None; Edmund Tsui, None; Jesse McCann, None; Irene Barbazetto, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 437. doi:
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      Maxwell Wagner, Nathaniel Tracer, Edmund Tsui, Jesse T McCann, Irene A Barbazetto; Long-Term Follow-Up of Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy Treated with Intravitreal Bevacizumab. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):437.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To evaluate the long-term outcomes of patients with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) receiving regular intravitreal bevacizumab injections as treatment.

Methods : A retrospective review of 21 eyes from 18 patients diagnosed with PCV was performed to assess longitudinal outcomes including best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central foveal thickness (CFT) and number of intravitreal injections. The mean BCVA and mean CFT at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, 18 months, and 24 months follow-up were compared to baseline using paired t-tests.

Results : The patients had a mean age of 68.9±7.1 years, a mean follow-up time of 23.9±20.5 months, and received a mean number of 9.3±6.9 injections. The mean baseline BCVA was 1.19±0.84 in LogMAR units and the mean baseline CFT was 389.2±127.9 µm. At 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, 18 months, and 24 months follow-up the mean BCVA was 1.15±0.9, 1.02±0.76, 1.11±0.76, 1.11±0.82, 1±0.88, 0.83±0.58, and 1±0.52 LogMAR units, respectively (P=0.09, P=0.06, P=0.13, P=0.22, P=0.13, P=0.34). The mean CFT at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, 18 months, and 24 months of follow-up were 376±94.7, 364.79±122.63, 380.1±156.95, 351.88±126.46, 357.17±88.22, and 350.25±62.32 µm, respectively (P=0.07, P=0.002, P=0.001, P=0.002, P=0.01, P=0.19). In addition, 9 eyes showed no regression of the polyps, 11 eyes showed partial regression of the polyps, and 1 eye showed total regression as ascertained by the presence of subretinal or intraretinal fluid on optical coherence tomography (OCT).

Conclusions : At 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, 18 months, and 24 months of follow-up the mean BCVA and mean CFT showed consistent improvement. The BCVA, while not significant, was improved at all follow-up visits relative to baseline. The CFT showed significant improvement at all follow-up visits except at 24 months compared to baseline. For both BCVA and CFT, at the 24-month follow-up the least significant improvement was seen. These results support the regular use of intravitreal bevacizumab injections in the treatment of PCV. However, they may indicate that the improved outcomes of injections are only observed within a year and deterioration may ensue in the long term.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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