June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Development of a hydrogel flowable dressing for the prevention of corneal scarring
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa J Hill
    Neuroscience & Ophthalmology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, United Kingdom
  • Gupreet Chouhan
    Neuroscience & Ophthalmology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, United Kingdom
  • Chairut Vareechon
    University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Eric Pearlman
    University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Saaeha Rauz
    Neuroscience & Ophthalmology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, United Kingdom
  • Graham R Wallace
    Neuroscience & Ophthalmology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, United Kingdom
  • Ann Logan
    Neuroscience & Ophthalmology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, United Kingdom
  • Liam Grover
    Neuroscience & Ophthalmology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Lisa Hill, None; Gupreet Chouhan, None; Chairut Vareechon, None; Eric Pearlman, None; Saaeha Rauz, None; Graham Wallace, None; Ann Logan, None; Liam Grover, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  MRC DPFS
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 1178. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Lisa J Hill, Gupreet Chouhan, Chairut Vareechon, Eric Pearlman, Saaeha Rauz, Graham R Wallace, Ann Logan, Liam Grover; Development of a hydrogel flowable dressing for the prevention of corneal scarring. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):1178.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Blindness caused by corneal opacity can result from the corneal scarring that develops after infectious diseases or inflammation. The ‘gold standard’ of treatment is amniotic membrane (AM) transplant to the ocular surface that induces healing and reduces scarring, through the release of anti-fibrotic/anti-inflammatory factors. However, the reproducibility of the clinical effects of AM transplants is limited by biological variability. Consequently, a plethora of alternative anti-scarring treatment strategies have been investigated, with nothing yet adopted to replace AM transplants. We are developing a transparent gel eye drop that can be applied to the damaged ocular surface and is capable of protecting the injured eye, providing sufficient lubrication as well as delivering the anti-scarring agent, Decorin, in a sustained manner to the cornea to promote scarless wound healing.

Methods : Gel dressings were produced with controlled temperature processing to form a fluid gel.In vitro Decorin release from the fluid gel was measured using a Decorin ELISA. For the ex vivo studies, the Decorin fluid gel was applied as a single dose to a rat corneal abrasion model to observe the effects on wound healing and re-epithelialisation. An in vivo mouse model of bacterial keratitis was used to assess the anti-scarring effects of the Decorin fluid gel when used in combination with the standard clinical treatments of gentamicin and steroid eye drops.

Results : Gel thickening occurred immediately when placed on the rat cornea as an eye drop. The gel evenly covered the ocular surface and remained for up to 2h. Decorin gels released a sustained dose of Decorin over 4h. Corneal re-epithelialisation occurred within 48h in the presence of the Decorin gel in the ex vivo models when compared to a Decorin-PBS drop which showed limited wound closure. Additionally, Decorin gel reduced corneal opacity compared to controls in the bacterial keratitis model when administered together with the gold standard steroid and gentamicin treatment, compared with steroid and gentamicin treatment alone.

Conclusions : We have successfully demonstrated the utility of a fluid gel ‘eye drop’ therapy for the attenuation of corneal scarring. The properties of the fluid gel allowed a sustained, effective dose of anti-fibrotic Decorin to be released onto the corneal surface and showed efficacy in reducing the corneal opacity associated with bacterial keratitis.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×