June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Impact of eye tracking technology on OCT-Angiography imaging
in patients with age-related macular degeneration
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jost Lennart Lauermann
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Muenster Medical Center, Muenster, Germany
  • Maximilian Treder
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Muenster Medical Center, Muenster, Germany
  • Christoph Roman Clemens
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Muenster Medical Center, Muenster, Germany
  • Nicole Eter
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Muenster Medical Center, Muenster, Germany
  • Florian Alten
    University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jost Lauermann, None; Maximilian Treder, None; Christoph Clemens, None; Nicole Eter, Alimera (R), Alimera sciences (C), Allergan (F), Allergan (R), Allergan (C), Bayer (F), Bayer (R), Bayer (C), Heidelberg Engineering (R), Novartis (F), Novartis (R), Novartis (C), Roche (C); Florian Alten, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 819. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Jost Lennart Lauermann, Maximilian Treder, Christoph Roman Clemens, Nicole Eter, Florian Alten; Impact of eye tracking technology on OCT-Angiography imaging
      in patients with age-related macular degeneration. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):819.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Image artefacts are currently among the most important limitations of optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) imaging. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of eye tracking (ET) technology on the manifestation of image artefacts in OCT-A imaging in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Methods : Multimodal retinal imaging including OCT-A was performed in 20 patients (78.9 ± 9.4 years) with different AMD stages. Central 3x3 mm2 OCT-A imaging was performed four times consecutively in each patient, twice with active and twice with inactive ET (Optovue, Angiovue). Parameters for image evaluation were signal strength index (SSI), image acquisition time, presence of imaging artefacts caused by eye movement and by software correction of eye movement (level 1-4). Images were evaluated by two independent readers with subsequent senior reader arbitration for presence of artefacts.

Results : Mean best corrected visual acuity was 0.52 ± 0.22. 14 patients had early and intermediate stages of AMD. Six patients had an exudative or atrophic late stage of the disease. Mean SSI was 54.45 ± 9.18 with inactive and 58.68 ± 7.41 with active ET. Mean image acquisition time was 24.38 ± 9.28 seconds and 17.58 ± 7.45 seconds with and without active ET (p = 0.001). Level of imaging artefacts was significantly higher with inactive ET (1.8 ± 0.57 vs. 2.98 ± 0.77; p < 0.001) Initial inter-observer agreement was 92.5%.

Conclusions : In patients with AMD, active ET technology in OCT-A imaging is able to reduce the presence of image artefacts at the expense of slightly increased acquisition times.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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