June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Investigating differences in the Cirrus OCT results for Hispanic and Black children from nine years through 17
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandra S Block
    School-Based Vision Clinic, Illinois College of Optometry, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Adrianna Hempelmann
    School-Based Vision Clinic, Illinois College of Optometry, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Sandra Block, None; Adrianna Hempelmann, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 1326. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Sandra S Block, Adrianna Hempelmann; Investigating differences in the Cirrus OCT results for Hispanic and Black children from nine years through 17. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):1326.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Our purpose was to look at Cirrus OCT collected to provide a reference database for a School-Based Vision Clinic serving Chicago Public School students. While we felt the large cups were physiologic, the patients were referred for baseline testing. The population served failed to follow through with our referrals. Our study collected OCTs from sequential patients (Hispanic or Black) until a minimum of 20 per age category, race, and sex were obtained to develop a database on this groups. There is evidence that there is a gender difference yet no one has compared the group by age category.

Methods : Patients who presented to IEI at Princeton vision clinic(11/14-11/16) an exam with dilation were invited to participate. Patients with retinal problems, optic nerve problems, diabetes, hypertention or other ocular disease were excluded. Patients were eligible if they were identified as Hispanic or Black. Eight subjects were excluded due to mixed race. Subjects were 9.0 years to 17.9 years. Currus HD-OCT scans (version 3.0.0.64) and fundus photos were gathered on 984 subjects. 83 were excluded. Data on RNFL thickness, optic nerve head parameters and macular parameters were collects. The analysis looked at the comaprison of these data by age category (by year 0-11 months), sex and race. Scans that were below a signal strength of 8 were excluded. The right eye was the eye chosen unless the scan was below the criteria stated, the left was used instead.

Results : The results for the horizontal/vertical cup/disk did not show a significant difference by age or race, but was significant (0.004) for sex. A review of the RNFL symmetty, rim area, disc area, and cup volume demonstrated no significant difference between age, sex, or race. When looking at the individual quadrants results were variable with race being significant in Q1-Q2, sex in Q3-Q4,and age in Q1 -Q3. Looking at the average RNFL age (.001) and race (0.013) were significant but sex was not.

Conclusions : The data that was demonostrated a minimal effect of age or race in the findings of Hispanic and Black children who were seen in our clinic.Several studies that have supported the difference in sex but it appears as if the RPE is only the primary contributing factor. Our results sugggest that is no signifcant difference in the C/D ratio by age category or race in this population. Further testing should expand the database to other races.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×