June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Long-term phenotype changes in patients with chronic central serous chorioretinopathy.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Johann Roider
    Klinik fur Ophthalmologie, University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany
  • Konstantine Purtskhvanidze
    Klinik fur Ophthalmologie, University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany
  • Vladimir Sheptulin
    Klinik fur Ophthalmologie, University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany
  • Danial Mohabati
    Ophthalmology, University of Leiden, Leiden, Netherlands
  • Elon HC van Dijk
    Ophthalmology, University of Leiden, Leiden, Netherlands
  • Camiel J F Boon
    Ophthalmology, University of Leiden, Leiden, Netherlands
  • Carel C B Hoyng
    Ophthalmology center, University of Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Johann Roider, None; Konstantine Purtskhvanidze, None; Vladimir Sheptulin, None; Danial Mohabati, None; Elon HC van Dijk, None; Camiel Boon, None; Carel Hoyng, None
  • Footnotes
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Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 1503. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Johann Roider, Konstantine Purtskhvanidze, Vladimir Sheptulin, Danial Mohabati, Elon HC van Dijk, Camiel J F Boon, Carel C B Hoyng; Long-term phenotype changes in patients with chronic central serous chorioretinopathy.
      . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):1503.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) is a disease that can manifest in different forms. It is under debate whether different CSC phenotypes can transform during the course of the disease. The purpose of the current study was to compare clinical and morphological characteristics of chronic CSC patients with unifocal and multifocal activity and various RPE changes during the long-term follow-up period.

Methods : The data of 124 eyes, followed up for at least 1 year between January 2003 and December 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Based on the fluorescence angiography (FA) performed at initial visit all patients were classified as having unifocal or multifocal activity and different area of RPE changes compared with the optic disc diameter. All patients were assessed in a subgroup analysis, based on the change of phenotype, for the following parameters: CSC duration, serous retinal detachment (SRD) persistence, region of activity and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) changes, presence of pigment epithelium detachment (PED), number and timing of recurrences, best-corrected visual acuities (BCVA) at various time-points and the types of treatment.

Results : Median age (range) was 42.5 years (27-67); 82.5% were male. Median follow-up was 44 months (12-189) and median CSC duration until the first admission was 3 months (0.25 – 144 months). The change of CSC phenotype was observed in 65 (52%) eyes, whereas 59 (48%) eyes remained unchanged during the follow – up period. We found a significant difference in CSC duration (63 months (19 - 298) vs. 54.5 months (13 - 419) respectively, p = 0.03), follow – up duration (54.5 months (12 – 153) vs. 39 months (13 – 110) respectively, p=0.018) SRD persistence (9 months (2 - 40) vs. 5 months (2 - 45) respectively, p< 0.001) and number of recurrent attacks (p=0.017), when comparing eyes with and without phenotype change.

Conclusions : Long-term follow-up results allowed to reveal the change of CSC phenotype in 52% of eyes. According to a multivariate regression analysis longer SRD persistence, number of recurrences and follow – up duration were the only independent variables, associated with the change of CSC phenotype. Different treatment approaches didn’t significantly influence phenotype change.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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