June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
The effect of nutrients on age-related macular degeneration
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shun Masuda
    Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
  • Satori Kaneoka
    Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
  • Mao Sasaki
    Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
  • Yoshiaki Kiuchi
    Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
  • Masahide Yanagi
    Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
  • Andi Akhmad Faisal
    Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia
  • Muhhmmad Irfan Kamaruddin
    Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia
  • Akiko Nagao
    Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
  • Masayasu Yoneda
    Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
  • Katsumasa Itakura
    Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Shun Masuda, None; Satori Kaneoka, None; Mao Sasaki, None; Yoshiaki Kiuchi, None; Masahide Yanagi, None; Andi Faisal, None; Muhhmmad Kamaruddin, None; Akiko Nagao, None; Masayasu Yoneda, None; Katsumasa Itakura, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 1520. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Shun Masuda, Satori Kaneoka, Mao Sasaki, Yoshiaki Kiuchi, Masahide Yanagi, Andi Akhmad Faisal, Muhhmmad Irfan Kamaruddin, Akiko Nagao, Masayasu Yoneda, Katsumasa Itakura; The effect of nutrients on age-related macular degeneration. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):1520.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Purpose: The prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is significantly increasing in Japan, which may be caused by changes in lifestyle and dietary habits. We conducted a cross-sectional observational study to investigate the association between nutrient intake and the prevalence of AMD.

Methods : We conducted medical examinations for 584 Japanese-Americans who participated in a Japanese-Americans health study in Los Angeles, August 2015. The protocol was approved by the Hiroshima University Ethics Committee in line with the provisions of the Declaration of Helsinki, and written informed consent was obtained from each participant. Following an overnight fast, each participant underwent an interview, physical examination, blood pressure measurements, and venous blood sampling. Using the nutrition support program (Chatty, Sakurasaku net, Osaka, Japan) a dietitian analyzed the nutrient intake of all participants. Retinal photographs were graded according to the Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System modified for nonstereoscopic retinal images. Early and late AMD were defined according to the type of lesion detected in the worse eye of the participants. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to identify the associations between nutrient intake and AMD changes.

Results : The macula in 471 participants (mean age 60.3±0.62 years) was normal and 113 participants (mean age 66.7±1.24 years) had early AMD. After adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and smoking status, we found that participants with early AMD had a higher intake of animal fat (P<0.001) and saturated fatty acid (P<0.001) than those without AMD. There was no difference in the amount of protein, carbohydrate, and vitamin A, B1, B2, and C intake between the two groups.

Conclusions : High intake of animal fat and saturated fatty acid may increase the risk of AMD.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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