June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Anterior chamber angle in aniridia with and without glaucoma
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Eitan Smith Burstein
    Ophthalmology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • Asima Bajwa
    Ophthalmology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • Jill A Nerby
    Ophthalmology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • Robert M Grainger
    Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • Peter A Netland
    Ophthalmology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Eitan Burstein, None; Asima Bajwa, None; Jill Nerby, None; Robert Grainger, None; Peter Netland, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Research supported by Aniridia Foundation International
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 2088. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Eitan Smith Burstein, Asima Bajwa, Jill A Nerby, Robert M Grainger, Peter A Netland; Anterior chamber angle in aniridia with and without glaucoma. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):2088.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : We performed a retrospective, comparative study to determine if patients with aniridia and glaucoma had open angles on high resolution anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) and clinical gonioscopy.

Methods : 43 patients (86 eyes) with aniridia had recorded anterior segment OCTs, gonioscopy, or both. Of these patients, 27 (54 eyes) were diagnosed with glaucoma, and 16 (32 eyes) had no evidence glaucoma. All patients had either anterior segment ocular coherence tomography, gonioscopy, or both. Patients with open angles had no evidence of angle closure, those with partial angle closure had 1 to 359 degrees of angle closure, and those with complete angle closure had completely closed anterior chamber angle.

Results : The 43 patients with aniridia had average age of 32 ± 17 yrs, and 27 (62%) were female. Anterior segment OCT and gonioscopy were recorded in 23 (53%) of the patients, and 20 (47%) of the patients had gonioscopy alone. Of the 54 eyes with aniridia and glaucoma, 4 (7%) eyes in 3 patients (11%) had partial or completely closed angles. Of the 32 eyes without glaucoma, all (100%) had open angles. The proportion of open angles in the aniridia with glaucoma eyes was not significantly different compared with the aniridia without glaucoma eyes (P = 0.32). Of the 4 eyes with closed angles, all had a history of prior surgery for cataract, glaucoma, and/or keratopathy.

Conclusions : The majority of eyes with aniridia and glaucoma have open anterior chamber angles, similar to patients with aniridia without glaucoma. Eyes with aniridia and glaucoma that had closed angles had a prior history of ocular surgery, which likely contributed to development of angle closure.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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