June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Difference in intraocular pressure following involuntary switch from bimatoprost 0.03% to bimatoprost 0.01% in glaucoma patients
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kristy Nguyen
    Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Kareem Moussa
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Jason Chien
    School of Medicine and Health Sciences, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
  • Robert L Stamper
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Kristy Nguyen, None; Kareem Moussa, None; Jason Chien, None; Robert Stamper, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Supported in part by Research to Prevent Blindness, The Fortisure Foundation, and That Man May See.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 2101. doi:
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      Kristy Nguyen, Kareem Moussa, Jason Chien, Robert L Stamper; Difference in intraocular pressure following involuntary switch from bimatoprost 0.03% to bimatoprost 0.01% in glaucoma patients. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):2101.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To determine the difference in IOP in patients with glaucoma following an involuntary switch from bimatoprost 0.03% to bimatoprost 0.01%

Methods : This retrospective chart audit was performed at an academic institution in San Francisco, California. Patients who were switched from bimatoprost 0.03% to 0.01% between June 2012 to June 2014 and had at least two recorded intraocular pressures before and after the January 2013 switch date were included. Patients with an insufficient number of recorded IOP’s, other medication switches, glaucoma or cataract surgery, laser trabeculoplasty, or intravitreal injections during the study period were excluded. A linear mixed effects regression model was used to estimate the difference of IOP.

Results : A total of 53 eyes met the criteria for inclusion and their results are presented here. The mean patient age was 70.54 ± 13.16 (mean ± SD). Mean IOP’s in glaucoma patients with use of Bimatoprost 0.03% and 0.01% were 15.1 mmHg (CI=14.3-15.8) and 16.0 mmHg (CI=15.2-16.7), respectively (p=0.0027). Mean difference (adjusted for time) was 1.01 mm Hg. The range of difference was from -5.75 mmHg to 6.00 mmHg. 8 of 53 eyes (15.1%) had a pressure rise of ≥ 3 mm Hg. No IOP differences were found for subgroups in age, race, gender and glaucoma type.

Conclusions : Switching from bimatoprost 0.03% to bimatoprost 0.01% led to a small but statistically significant increase in intraocular IOP. The range of differences suggest that, in some patients, the difference could, in fact, be clinically significant. A prospective study would be helpful in determining if the differences noted in retrospect are real.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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