June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Factors associated with uveitis among Ebola survivors in the PREVAIL III study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Allen O Eghrari
    Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
    Partnership for Research on Ebola Virus in Liberia, Monrovia, Liberia
  • Bryn Burkholder
    Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Robin Ross
    Partnership for Research on Ebola Virus in Liberia, Monrovia, Liberia
  • Kirsten Tawse
    Partnership for Research on Ebola Virus in Liberia, Monrovia, Liberia
  • Sasapin Grace Prakalapakorn
    Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Cavan Reilly
    Biostatistics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
    Partnership for Research on Ebola Virus in Liberia, Monrovia, Liberia
  • Mosoka Fallah
    Partnership for Research on Ebola Virus in Liberia, Monrovia, Liberia
  • Michael Sneller
    National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Rachel Bishop
    National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Allen Eghrari, None; Bryn Burkholder, None; Robin Ross, None; Kirsten Tawse, None; Sasapin Prakalapakorn, None; Cavan Reilly, None; Mosoka Fallah, None; Michael Sneller, None; Rachel Bishop, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH K12 EY015025-10, NIH L30 EY024746
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 2178. doi:
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      Allen O Eghrari, Bryn Burkholder, Robin Ross, Kirsten Tawse, Sasapin Grace Prakalapakorn, Cavan Reilly, Mosoka Fallah, Michael Sneller, Rachel Bishop; Factors associated with uveitis among Ebola survivors in the PREVAIL III study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):2178.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Survivors of Ebola virus disease frequently experience intraocular inflammation in the months following systemic infection. Little is known regarding the factors associated with uveitis in a comprehensive population of survivors.

Methods : The PREVAIL III study is the only study of Ebola survivors with enrollment of close contacts and serology confirmation of disease. All survivors were referred for comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation including slit-lamp biomicroscopy, dilated indirect ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography imaging of the macula and optic nerve. Demographic information was collected at the time of enrollment. Uveitis, active or inactive, was diagnosed based on the presence of keratic precipitates, anterior chamber cell, posterior synechiae, vitreous cell or signs of retinal inflammation.

Results : A total of 789 serology-confirmed Ebola survivors underwent baseline eye examination. Uveitis was diagnosed in 68 participants. Increased time spent in the Ebola treatment unit was associated with presence of uveitis (19 vs. 15 days, p=0.002). Younger age was marginally associated with the presence of uveitis (p=0.05). The presence at baseline of HIV (p=0.80) or syphilis (p=0.48) was not associated with uveitis among survivors, nor was the presence of antibody level (p=0.66) or at least one positive semen result (p=0.16).

Conclusions : In this largest sample of Ebola survivors to date, the time spent in the Ebola unit, perhaps associated with severity of disease, was associated with long-term risk of uveitis. However, uveitis does not appear to correlate with a more robust antibody response or with viral persistence in testes. The public health ramifications of these findings will be discussed.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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