June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Deafferented mouse rod bipolar cells extend their dendrites and synapse with healthy photoreceptors
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anahit Hovhannisyan
    SCIPP, UCSC, Santa Cruz, California, United States
  • Corinne Beier
    Electrical Engineering, UCSC, Santa Cruz, California, United States
  • Lee Daeyoung
    Ophthalmology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States
  • Philip Huie
    Ophthalmology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States
    Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States
  • Sydney Weiser
    Biomed, UCSC, Santa Cruz, California, United States
    Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, UCSC, Santa Cruz, California, United States
  • Daniel V Palanker
    Ophthalmology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States
    Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States
  • Alexander Sher
    SCIPP, UCSC, Santa Cruz, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Anahit Hovhannisyan, None; Corinne Beier, None; Lee Daeyoung, None; Philip Huie, None; Sydney Weiser, None; Daniel Palanker, None; Alexander Sher, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  This work was supported by Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award at the Scientific Interface, Pew Charitable Trusts Scholarship in the Biomedical Sciences, NIH EY023020 – 01 (AS)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 2223. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Anahit Hovhannisyan, Corinne Beier, Lee Daeyoung, Philip Huie, Sydney Weiser, Daniel V Palanker, Alexander Sher; Deafferented mouse rod bipolar cells extend their dendrites and synapse with healthy photoreceptors. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):2223.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Previous studies from our group demonstrated constructive restructuring in the rod bipolar cells of the rabbit retina in response to selectivelaser ablation of a small patch of photoreceptors. The mouse is a more convenient animal model for investigation of the molecular mechanisms responsible for this restructuring due to availability of the genetically modified lines. We investigate retinal response to photoreceptor ablation in the mouse to test if it can be used as a model for constructive retinal restructuring.

Methods : Round lesions of Barely Visible clinical grade were placed in-vivo in the mouse retina with a 532-nm laser, using 200μm spot diameter and 20ms pulse duration. Photoreceptor migration and changes in the morphology of the deafferented rod bipolar cells (RBCs) were assessed using confocal microscopy of immunostained tissue. RBCs and their synaptic contacts with photoreceptors were visualized with PKCα, CtBP2, mGluR6 and ELFN1 antibodies. Cone arrestin antibody was used to visualize cone photoreceptors.

Results : The photocoagulation procedure resulted in the death of rod but not cone photoreceptors at the lesion site. No damage to the neurons in the inner nuclear layer was observed. We find that over time (3-180 days after photocoagulation), healthy rod photoreceptors partially fill the lesioned area. During this process, RBCs change their dendritic morphology: first they lose thinner processes, leaving one or two dendrites, which then expand, on average, from 10µm to 30µm in length, and from 0.3 to 1µm in thickness. These thickened dendrites extend towards the healthy photoreceptors located around the lesion and make synapses similar to those of the healthy RBCs. The dendrites of the deafferented RBCs also approach the pedicles of the cone photoreceptors that survived the ablation in the middle of the lesion.

Conclusions : Deafferented mouse RBCs restructure their dendritic trees to form new connections with healthy photoreceptors outside the lesion, similar to our earlier observations in the rabbit retina. In the center of the lesion, they approach surviving cone photoreceptors more often than in the healthy retina. The mouse model, with the broad range of its genetic control, can be used to study molecular mechanisms behind the constructive retinal plasticity.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×